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Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574
Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574

He was first taught in his native Arezzo by the little-known French glass painter and fresco painter, Guillaume de Marcillat (1475-1529 or 1537). By 1524, he had moved to Florence, where he worked for Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530), in whose studio he became acquainted with Francesco Salviati (1510-1563). During his early training in Florence, he met Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Baccio Bandinelli (1

Romano, Giulio (Giovanni Francesco Penni)
Rome (Italy), H. 1499 - Mantua (Italy), 01.11.1546
Romano, Giulio (Giovanni Francesco Penni)
Rome (Italy), H. 1499 - Mantua (Italy), 01.11.1546

Giulio Romano (Giulio Pippi) worked with Raphael (1483-1520), first as a pupil and then as an assistant, and was involved in the decoration both of the Vatican Stanze, in particular that of the Stanze dell'Incendio (completed by 1517) and the Logge (completed 1519). Following Raphael's death in 1520, Giulio collaborated with Giovanni Francesco Penni (c. 1496-after 1528) on the decoration of the Sa

Madrazo y Agudo, José de
Santander (Spain), 22.4.1781 - Madrid (Spain), 8.5.1859
Madrazo y Agudo, José de
Santander (Spain), 22.4.1781 - Madrid (Spain), 8.5.1859

As the founder of a line of outstanding 19th-century Spanish artists, José de Madrazo y Agudo is one of the great names in Spanish neoclassicism. His work, his preeminent position in Spanish society and his deep influence on many generations of painters trained at the Academy of San Fernando make him a fundamental figure of this period.After preliminary studies in Madrid with Gregorio Ferro (1742-

Giordano, Luca
Naples (Italy), 1634 - Naples (Italy), 1705
Giordano, Luca
Naples (Italy), 1634 - Naples (Italy), 1705

During his life, Luca Giordano enjoyed a popularity in both Italy and Spain that plummeted after his death, due to two prejudices that have lasted until quite recently. The first was an association of his surprising speed as a painter with the idea that his work was somehow superficial, an accusation constantly leveled at him by advocates of the Greco-Roman aesthetic. The second stemmed from his s

Giaquinto, Corrado
Molfetta, Apulia (Italy), 1703 - Naples (Italy), 1766
Giaquinto, Corrado
Molfetta, Apulia (Italy), 1703 - Naples (Italy), 1766

Considered the maximum representative of rococo painting in Rome during the first half of the 18th century and a referent for various generations of Spanish painters, this artist produced abundant oil paintings and most of all, frescoes. He studied with Saverio Porta until 1719, moving to Naples in 1721 to work under the tutelage of Nicola Maria Rossi, a follower of Francesco Solimena. His deep st

Camarón y Meliá, Juan José
Segorbe, Castellón (Spain), 1760 -
Camarón y Meliá, Juan José
Segorbe, Castellón (Spain), 1760 -

The son of José Camarón Bonanat and brother of Manuel -both painters- he studied at the School of Fine Arts of San Carlos in Valencia and later obtained a pension to continue his studies in rome. When he returned he was appointed chamber painter, director of painting at the Royal Porcelain Factory, academician of merit at the Royal Academy of San Carlos in Valencia, and assistant director of the R

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