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Correa de Vivar, Juan
Mascaraque (Toledo, Spain), hacia 1510 - Toledo (Spain), 1566
Correa de Vivar, Juan
Mascaraque (Toledo, Spain), hacia 1510 - Toledo (Spain), 1566

As early as 1527, his name appears linked to his teacher, Juan de Borgoña, and other painters from Toledo, including Pedro de Cisneros and Francisco Comontes, with whom he frequently collaborated, especially in that city. In the fifteen thirties, after completing his training, he undertook important projects, their first of which was probably the retables for the Poor Clares' monastery in Griñón (

Machuca, Pedro
Toledo, H.1490 - Granada, 1550
Machuca, Pedro
Toledo, H.1490 - Granada, 1550

His stay in Italy was already documented in 1517, when he signed The Virgin and the Souls of Purgatory (Museo del Prado). This work's style has led him to be related with Raphael's workshop, especially with some of his frescoes for the vatican stanze. Various contemporaneous references to a Petro Spagnolo have also linked him to Michelangelo and to other temporary creations in Rome in 1515. Machuc

Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574
Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574

He was first taught in his native Arezzo by the little-known French glass painter and fresco painter, Guillaume de Marcillat (1475-1529 or 1537). By 1524, he had moved to Florence, where he worked for Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530), in whose studio he became acquainted with Francesco Salviati (1510-1563). During his early training in Florence, he met Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Baccio Bandinelli (1

Romana, Pedro
Córdoba, Ca. 1460 - Córdoba, 1536
Romana, Pedro
Córdoba, Ca. 1460 - Córdoba, 1536

This Spanish painter from the early Andalusian Renaissance was trained in the Spanish-Flemish style but later drew on Italian models present in Cordoba, where he had his workshop from at least 1496. That is the year when Alejo Fernández's presence in that city was first documented. The first reference to Pedro Romana is from 1488, when he was commissioned to make part of an altarpiece for the conv

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