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Cambiaso, Luca
Moneglia, Liguria, 1527 - El Escorial, Madrid, 1585
Cambiaso, Luca
Moneglia, Liguria, 1527 - El Escorial, Madrid, 1585

Luca Cambiaso was the most celebrated Mannerist painter of the Genoese school, and the inventor of many large-scale fresco decorations in both palaces and churches in the city. As a draftsman, he is celebrated for having invented a style of figure drawing in which form is simplified into geometric, often cubic, components. Trained by his father, the mediocre painter Giovanni Cambiaso (1495-1579),

Sarto, Andrea del (Andrea d'Agnolo)
Florence, 1486 - Florence, 1530
Sarto, Andrea del (Andrea d'Agnolo)
Florence, 1486 - Florence, 1530

Vasari (1511-1574), who was himself a pupil of Andrea del Sarto (Andrea d'Agnolo) during the mid-1520s, indicated that this painter and draftsman trained under an obscure artist, Gian Barile, before moving to the workshop of Piero di Cosimo (1461/62-c. 1521). He gained independence in 1508 when, with Franciabigio (1484-1525), he established his own workshop. Around this time, del Sarto secured a n

Passerotti, Bartolomeo
Bologna, 1529 - Bologna, 1592
Passerotti, Bartolomeo
Bologna, 1529 - Bologna, 1592

Probably at the instigation of the architect Vignola (1507-1573), Passerotti received his education in Rome, as the pupil of Taddeo Zuccaro (1529-1566). He remained there for around fifteen years, during which time he earned a reputation as a distinguished portraitist, a genre he continued to pursue throughout his career. But one of Passerotti's first works following his return to Bologna, the Vir

Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574
Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574

He was first taught in his native Arezzo by the little-known French glass painter and fresco painter, Guillaume de Marcillat (1475-1529 or 1537). By 1524, he had moved to Florence, where he worked for Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530), in whose studio he became acquainted with Francesco Salviati (1510-1563). During his early training in Florence, he met Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Baccio Bandinelli (1

Il Bergamasco
Gandino, Bergamo, Ca. 1509 - Madrid, 1569
Il Bergamasco
Gandino, Bergamo, Ca. 1509 - Madrid, 1569

Giovanni Battista Castello began his career as a goldsmith's apprentice in the workshop of his father, specializing from the beginning as a painter of miniatures. Later Castello became the associate and friend of the younger painter Cambiaso (1527-1585), with whom he worked on a number of projects in Genoa, from c. 1560 right up until his departure for Spain in c. 1566-1567. There he was employed

Samacchini, Orazio
Bologna, 1532 - Bologna, 1577
Samacchini, Orazio
Bologna, 1532 - Bologna, 1577

Samacchini trained under Pellegrino Tibaldi (1527-1596), but his early work was influenced primarily by such artists as Raphael (1483-1520) and Prospero Fontana (1512-1597), as is detectable in the Marriage of the Virgin (c. 1555-1560) for S. Giuseppe in Bologna. In 1563 he worked in the Vatican, participating in the decoration of the Sala Regia and the Belvedere. This experience of Rome exposed S

Perino del Vaga
Florence, 1501 - Rome, 1547
Perino del Vaga
Florence, 1501 - Rome, 1547

Pietro Buonaccorsi, called Perino del Vaga was, from age eleven, a pupil of Ridolfo Ghirlandaio (1483-1561); and later he was taken as a youth to Rome by an elusive painter, "il Vaga," whence the former's nomenclature. Here, he attracted the, attention of Raphael (1483-1520) and was employed as an assistant to Giovanni da Udine (1487-1564) on the decoration of the Vatican Logge (completed 1519). H

Castello, Bernardo
Genoa, H. 1557 - Genoa, 1629
Castello, Bernardo
Genoa, H. 1557 - Genoa, 1629

Castello was taught by Andrea Semino (c. 1526-1594) and subsequently by Luca Cambiaso (1527-1585); when the latter artist moved to Madrid in 1583, Castello emerged as one of Genoa’s leading painters. Around this time he painted the Stoning of St. Stephen (Palermo, S. Giorgio dei Genovesi), which was copied from Giulio Romano (c. 1499-1546). But Cambiaso’s influence had been so intrinsic to his dev

Polidoro da Caravaggio
Caravaggio, H. 1499 - Messina, H. 1543
Polidoro da Caravaggio
Caravaggio, H. 1499 - Messina, H. 1543

Polidoro left his native Lombardy for Rome around 1515, where he entered the workshop of Raphael (1483-1520). In 1517-1518 he worked with Giulio Romano (c. 1499-1546) and Perino del Vaga (1501-1547) on the frescoes in the Vatican Logge; he developed a particularly close friendship with the latter artist, who probably prepared the plans for Polidoro's frescoes of the Passion (early 1520s) in the Ca

Tavarone, Lazzaro
Genoa, H. 1556 - Genoa, 1641
Tavarone, Lazzaro
Genoa, H. 1556 - Genoa, 1641

A student of Luca Cambiaso (1527-85) from around the late 1560s, they both moved to Spain in 1583, when the master accepted an invitation to work for Philip II. Although Cambiaso died shortly thereafter, Tavarone remained in Spain and is subsequently documented as working with Fabrizio Castello (c. 1560-1617) and Nicolas Granello (c. 1550-1593). He returned to Genoa in 1591, here his most successf

Ansaldo, Giovanni Andrea
Voltri, Genoa, 1584 - Genoa, 1638
Ansaldo, Giovanni Andrea
Voltri, Genoa, 1584 - Genoa, 1638

He was first trained by Orazio Cambiaso (active between 1583 and 1600), son of Luca Cambiaso (1527-1585). He spent most of his career in Genoa, where he was a successful painter of large-scale fresco decorations, often featuring elaborate settings of feigned architecture. Ansaldo combined the ethos of the local Genoese school, dominated by Cambiaso's studio, with other trends from Northern Italian

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