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Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Pieve di Cadore, Belluno, Veneto (Italy), Ca. 1490 - Venice (Italy), 1576
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Pieve di Cadore, Belluno, Veneto (Italy), Ca. 1490 - Venice (Italy), 1576

Born to an important family from Cadore, Titan arrived in Venice around 1500-1502. There, after first working in Giovanni Bellini’s workshop, he entered that of his older brother Gentile Bellini. Around 1507, he began working with Giorgone on the decoration of the façades of the Fondaco dei Tedeschi, the German merchants’ warehouse in Venice. Today, only a small part of the original frescoes remai

Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Venice (Italy), 1518/19 - Venice, 1594
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Venice (Italy), 1518/19 - Venice, 1594

In his biography of Tintoretto Carlo Ridolfi recounts the painter’s fleeting stay at Titian’s studio. But despite the unquestionable authority of this narrative, Tintoretto’s early works bear little resemblance to those of that artist from Pieve di Cadore. His paintings from the late 1530s—The Holy Family with Saint Jerome, the portrait of attorney Girolamo Marcello (private collection, Lucerne),

Sarto, Andrea del (Andrea d'Agnolo)
Florence, 1486 - Florence, 1530
Sarto, Andrea del (Andrea d'Agnolo)
Florence, 1486 - Florence, 1530

Vasari (1511-1574), who was himself a pupil of Andrea del Sarto (Andrea d'Agnolo) during the mid-1520s, indicated that this painter and draftsman trained under an obscure artist, Gian Barile, before moving to the workshop of Piero di Cosimo (1461/62-c. 1521). He gained independence in 1508 when, with Franciabigio (1484-1525), he established his own workshop. Around this time, del Sarto secured a n

Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574
Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574

He was first taught in his native Arezzo by the little-known French glass painter and fresco painter, Guillaume de Marcillat (1475-1529 or 1537). By 1524, he had moved to Florence, where he worked for Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530), in whose studio he became acquainted with Francesco Salviati (1510-1563). During his early training in Florence, he met Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Baccio Bandinelli (1

Maganza, Alessandro
Vicenza, 1556 - Vicenza, Después de 1630
Maganza, Alessandro
Vicenza, 1556 - Vicenza, Después de 1630

Alessandro Maganza, was the best-known member of a family of painters from Vicenza, in whose workshop he trained before moving to that of Giovanni Antonio Fasolo (1530-1572). Thereafter he was in Venice (c. 1572-1576), and his subsequent work shows the various influences of the leading artists of that city: Tintoretto (1519-1594), Veronese (1528-1588), and Palma Il Giovane (c. 1548-1628) as well a

Luini, Aurelio
Milan, H. 1530 - Milan, 1593
Luini, Aurelio
Milan, H. 1530 - Milan, 1593

Together with his brother Giovan Pietro, Luini was the perpetuator of the style of their father, the Milanese painter, Bernardino Luini (c. 1480/85-1532), whose premature death left his frescoes in S. Maurizio, Milan incomplete. Executed during the 1550s, they reflect the style both of his deceased father and that of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519); they were completed posthumously by his two sons.

Gambara, Lattanzio
Brescia, 1530 - Brescia, 1574
Gambara, Lattanzio
Brescia, 1530 - Brescia, 1574

Prolific frescoist and draftsman; it is probable that Gambara trained in the Campi workshop at Cremona, before returning to Brescia in 1549. There, he became an assistant to Gerolamo Romanino (1484/87-[?]1560), marrying the latter's daughter, Margherita, in 1556. Thenceforth, he continued to work mainly in his native Brescia, but also spent periods in Mantua, Cremona, and Parma. In the '1550s, he

Bandinelli, Baccio
Florence, 1493 - Florence, 1560
Bandinelli, Baccio
Florence, 1493 - Florence, 1560

Bandinelli was, after Michelangelo (1474-1564), the leading Florentine sculptor of the period. He was the son of the prominent Florentine goldsmith Michelangelo di Viviano (1459-1528), by whom he was first trained, and was subsequently apprenticed to a number of sculptors, including Gianfrancesco Rustici (1474-1554). Bandinelli was unswervingly loyal to the ruling Medici house, which resulted in a

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