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Ribalta, Francisco
Solsona, Lérida (Spain), 1565 - Valencia (Spain), 1628
Ribalta, Francisco
Solsona, Lérida (Spain), 1565 - Valencia (Spain), 1628

This artist of Catalan origin received his early training in El Escorial, where he was surrounded by Spanish and Italian artists and their works and was able to follow their most significant innovations. He thus developed an eclectic style that combined Cincinato's rhetoric with Tibaldi's daring foreshortening and Bartolomé Carducho's gravity with Navarrete's dramatic approach, as well as the chia

Navarrete ''el Mudo'', Juan Fernández
Logroño, Ca. 1538 - Toledo, 1579
Navarrete ''el Mudo'', Juan Fernández
Logroño, Ca. 1538 - Toledo, 1579

Early death put an end to the career of this artist hired by Philip II to depict on canvas the Counterreformation's proposals for devotional images—a subject that greatly concerned the monarch during the decoration of the monastery at El Escorial. Friar José de Sigüenza, the Hieronymite Order's historian, had already noted Philip II's melancholy after Navarrete's death, as well as the posterior em

Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574
Vasari, Giorgio
Arezzo, 1511 - Florence, 1574

He was first taught in his native Arezzo by the little-known French glass painter and fresco painter, Guillaume de Marcillat (1475-1529 or 1537). By 1524, he had moved to Florence, where he worked for Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530), in whose studio he became acquainted with Francesco Salviati (1510-1563). During his early training in Florence, he met Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Baccio Bandinelli (1

Borgoña the Younger, Juan de
Toledo, H.1500 - Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca), 1565
Borgoña the Younger, Juan de
Toledo, H.1500 - Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca), 1565

This follower and disciple of his father, Juan de Borgoña, has been identified by Díaz Padrón as the Master of Pozuelo and of Toro, active in Toledo between 1533 and 1565. After studying with his father, a great master of the same name, he began work at an unknown date in his prosperous workshop. Due to the lack of documentary information about his career, his biography has been reconstructed on t

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