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Carducho, Vicente
Florence (Italy), Ca. 1576 - Madrid (Spain), 1638
Carducho, Vicente
Florence (Italy), Ca. 1576 - Madrid (Spain), 1638

This Italian painter had a fecund and influential career at court in Madrid, especially with religious works whose initial Counter-Reformation classicism evolved towards a sometimes highly intense naturalism. He arrived at San Lorenzo de El Escorial in 1585 with his brother, Bartolomé, who was Federico Zuccaro's assistant and young Vicente's teacher. In 1599, he took part in the decorations for Qu

El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos)
Candia, Crete (Greece), 1541 - Toledo (Spain), 1614
El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos)
Candia, Crete (Greece), 1541 - Toledo (Spain), 1614

This Spanish painter of Greek origin was born in the capital city of the Isle of Crete, which then belonged to the Republic of Venice. His family was Greek, but probably Catholic rather than Orthodox, and its members collaborated with the colonial powers. He was trained as an Icon painter in the late-Byzantine tradition, but contact with Italian engravings allowed him to absorb and partially emplo

Morales, Luis de
Badajoz (Spain), hacia 1510 - Alcántara? (Spain), 1586
Morales, Luis de
Badajoz (Spain), hacia 1510 - Alcántara? (Spain), 1586

Luis de Morales was born in 1510 or 1511. In an affidavit made in December 1584, the painter declared himself to “be of the age of seventy-three or four years”, an affirmation that confirms the information given by Antonio Palomino in his “Vidas”. The painter almost certainly died in 1586 in Alcántara, the place where he had settled in the last years of his life. According to the testimony of his

Fernández, Gregorio
Sarriá, Lugo (Spain), 1576 - Valladolid (Spain), 1636
Fernández, Gregorio
Sarriá, Lugo (Spain), 1576 - Valladolid (Spain), 1636

The artistic tradition associated with Valladolid -which had reached such a high level in the 16th century- and the fact that it was the Spanish monarchy's favorite city between 1601 and 1606, was responsible for a considerable number of 17th-century artists who prolonged the splendor attained earlier by Alonso Berruguete, Juan de Juni and Pompeo Leoni. This indisputable reality was reinforced by

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