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Cambiaso, Luca
Moneglia, Liguria, 1527 - El Escorial, Madrid, 1585
Cambiaso, Luca
Moneglia, Liguria, 1527 - El Escorial, Madrid, 1585

Luca Cambiaso was the most celebrated Mannerist painter of the Genoese school, and the inventor of many large-scale fresco decorations in both palaces and churches in the city. As a draftsman, he is celebrated for having invented a style of figure drawing in which form is simplified into geometric, often cubic, components. Trained by his father, the mediocre painter Giovanni Cambiaso (1495-1579),

Tavarone, Lazzaro
Genoa, H. 1556 - Genoa, 1641
Tavarone, Lazzaro
Genoa, H. 1556 - Genoa, 1641

A student of Luca Cambiaso (1527-85) from around the late 1560s, they both moved to Spain in 1583, when the master accepted an invitation to work for Philip II. Although Cambiaso died shortly thereafter, Tavarone remained in Spain and is subsequently documented as working with Fabrizio Castello (c. 1560-1617) and Nicolas Granello (c. 1550-1593). He returned to Genoa in 1591, here his most successf

Ansaldo, Giovanni Andrea
Voltri, Genoa, 1584 - Genoa, 1638
Ansaldo, Giovanni Andrea
Voltri, Genoa, 1584 - Genoa, 1638

He was first trained by Orazio Cambiaso (active between 1583 and 1600), son of Luca Cambiaso (1527-1585). He spent most of his career in Genoa, where he was a successful painter of large-scale fresco decorations, often featuring elaborate settings of feigned architecture. Ansaldo combined the ethos of the local Genoese school, dominated by Cambiaso's studio, with other trends from Northern Italian

Castello, Bernardo
Genoa, H. 1557 - Genoa, 1629
Castello, Bernardo
Genoa, H. 1557 - Genoa, 1629

Castello was taught by Andrea Semino (c. 1526-1594) and subsequently by Luca Cambiaso (1527-1585); when the latter artist moved to Madrid in 1583, Castello emerged as one of Genoa’s leading painters. Around this time he painted the Stoning of St. Stephen (Palermo, S. Giorgio dei Genovesi), which was copied from Giulio Romano (c. 1499-1546). But Cambiaso’s influence had been so intrinsic to his dev

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