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Fyt, Jan
Antwerp, 1611 - Antwerp, 1661
Fyt, Jan
Antwerp, 1611 - Antwerp, 1661

He began painting under the guidance of Hans van den Berch, with whom he began training around 1621. His great master, however, would be Frans Snyders. He attained the rank of master of the painters’ Guild of Saint Luke in Antwerp around 1629–1630, although he continued to work for Snyders for some time. In 1633–1634, he was in Paris, and later in Italy. He visited Naples, Florence and Genoa. Some

Boel, Peeter
Antwerp, 1622 - Antwerp, 1674
Boel, Peeter
Antwerp, 1622 - Antwerp, 1674

He was a Flemish painter, draughtsman and engraver. He was the son of the engraver, publisher and art dealer Jan Boel and he received training from the painter Jan Fyt and presumably from Frans Snyders. In the early years of his career, he travelled to Italy. During his stay in Genoa, he met the painter and art dealer Cornelis de Wael. However, there is no evidence of paintings from this period. A

Luyckx, Carstian
Amberes, 1623 - Post. 1653
Luyckx, Carstian
Amberes, 1623 - Post. 1653

Luyckx was a Flemish painter who specialised in still life paintings in all their forms: vases, vanitas, banquets, festoons of flowers, fruit bowls, garlands. At the same time, he also produced several history paintings. From 1639 to March 1642, he received training from Philips de Marlier and was subsequently a pupil of Frans Francken III. He attained the rank of master on 17 July 1645. In 1646,

Utrecht, Adriaen van
Antwerp, 1599 - 1652
Utrecht, Adriaen van
Antwerp, 1599 - 1652

A Flemish painter, he was an apprentice to Herman de Ryt from 1614 and visited France, Italy and Germany. In 1625, he returned to Antwerp, where he worked as a master. His work was based on that of Snyders, of whose he became a faithful follower, particularly in the detailed and decorative conception of his still lifes. Nevertheless, although Utrecht’s work adopts the same abundant arrangement com

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