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The Inquisition
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Inquisition
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

A Fair in Madrid
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Fair in Madrid
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A group of individuals appear in front of the stall of a seller who displays his vessels, furniture, used clothing and paintings. Others people visit the other stalls around the Plaza de la Cebada, where all sorts of objects, including paintings, were sold. The background offers a view of the imposing Church of San Francisco el Grande. Goya presents certain types and customs of Madrid´s society, s

Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a hunting stand with two caged birds as decoys, a crouching dog, and a net on the tree that frames the group. The study of the birds and dog, as well as the bush in the foreground, reveal Goya´s interest in flora and fauna, which he paints with precision. The mitte owl, a nocturnal bird, is quite similar to the owl Goya used in his drawings and etchings as a personification of evil f

Boys picking Fruit
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boys picking Fruit
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A boy steps on another's back as he attempts to climb a tree and pick its fruit, while two others watch expectantly, hoping to receive some. This is one of Goya's cartoons for the tapestries intended to hang in the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife Maria Luisa de Parma) at El Escorial. Goya knew the world of children and repeated similar subjects

The Duke and Duchess of Osuna and their Children
Oil on unlined canvas. 1787 - 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Duke and Duchess of Osuna and their Children
Oil on unlined canvas. 1787 - 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A portrait of the Duke of Osuna, Pedro Téllez Girón (1755-1807); his wife, the Countess-Duchess of Benavente, Josefa Alonso de Pimentel (1752-1834) and their four children: Francisco de Borja (1785-1820), the following Duke of Osuna; Pedro de Alcántara (1786-1851), the future Prince of Anglona; Maria Manuela (1783-1838) and Joaquina (1784-1851), the future Marchioness of Santa

Christ Crucified
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Christ Crucified
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The figure of Christ is depicted following the tradition of seventeenth-century Spanish religious painting, although the classical concept of beauty disseminated in Spain by Mengs and Bayeu is also evident. In addition, Goya softened the more cruel and dramatic aspects of this subject, emphasising the beauty of the nude body. The canvas was presented by the artist at the Real Academia de Bellas Ar

Witches' Sabbath, or the Great He-Goat
Oil on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Witches' Sabbath, or the Great He-Goat
Oil on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

The Game of Horse and Rider
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Game of Horse and Rider
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Five boys play at riding on each other´s shoulders in the game called “Chicken Fights” or “Horse and Rider” in a setting of hills and woods. This work is one of the cartoons for a series of gay, playful tapestries intended for the bedrooms of the infantas —the daughters of the future Carlos IV (1748-1819) and María Luisa de Parma (1751-1788)— at the El Pardo Palace in Madrid. Goya rec

Blind Man’s Buff
Oil on canvas. 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Blind Man’s Buff
Oil on canvas. 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A circle of ten Majos and Majas play blind man´s buff on the banks of what may be the Manzanares River. This work is the only sketch for the cartoon Goya painted for a series of playful and gay tapestries intended for the bedroom of the Infantas —the daughters of the future Carlos IV (1748-1819) and María Luisa de Parma (1751-1818)— at Madrid´s El Pardo Palace. Originally titled

Carlos IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1789
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Carlos IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1789
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A portrait of King Carlos IV (1784-1819) wearing red velvet and decorated with the Golden Fleece, on a background of curtains that partially hide a crown at the right edge of the composition. This work may have been made shortly after the Monarch took the throne, as he still wears the sash of Carlos III (1716-1788), whose design was specified on 24 October 1772. Its combination of colors was modif

Asmodea
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Asmodea
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

Reading
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Reading
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

Children blowing up a Bladder
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Children blowing up a Bladder
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Some boys whose clothing indicates they are from a wealthy family, play in the country, inflating a bladder under the watchful eyes of their nannies, who converse in the background. This is one of Goya's first depictions of the world of children and it already perfectly captures the candor an vivacity of children's games. Designed to hang over a door, this is one of Goya's cartoons for the tapestr

Boy with a Bird
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boy with a Bird
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Seated and seen from behind, a boy plays with a goldfinch. The bird’s mate is perched high up on a branch of the slender tree, its sinuous line emphasising the verticality of the composition.This cartoon was for one of the tapestries now in the Monastery of El Escorial. Like its pair Boy with Tree (P-789), this is a design for a narrow panel to hang between the corner of a room and a door or windo

The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In October 1777, Goya received a commission to paint 20 cartoons for tapestries intended to decorate the walls of the Prince and Princess of Asturias´s bedchamber and its anteroom in the palace of El Pardo, north of Madrid, while he was completing designs of other tapestries for their dining room. This would be the third set of cartoons commissioned from the young Goya and proposed by Anton Raphae

Saturn
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Saturn
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

Ferdinand VII in Court Dress
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Ferdinand VII in Court Dress
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Born in 1784 in El Escorial, Fernando VII was Carlos IV eldest son by Maria Luisa. In 1815, after abolishing the Constitution, he reined as an absolute monarch. He appears wearing the symbols of his royal condition, with a purple, ermine-lined robe, and a scepter with the coat of arms of Castile and Leon in his right hand. The sash of the Order of Carlos III crosses his chest, and he also bears th

The 12th Marchioness of Villafranca painting her Husband
Oil on canvas. 1804
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The 12th Marchioness of Villafranca painting her Husband
Oil on canvas. 1804
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

María Tomasa Palafox (1780-1835), Marchioness of Villafranca, is shown wearing a white empire-style dress and sitting on a red silk damask armchair, with her feet on a cushion. She is painting a portrait of her husband, Francisco de Borja Álvarez de Toledo y Gonzaga, XI Marquis of Villafranca. The Marchioness received an enlightened education from her mother, the Countess of Montijo.

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