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The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian represented the Gospel account of the burial of Christ (Matthew 27: 57-61; Mark 15: 44-47; Luke 23: 50-54; John 19: 38-42) on several occasions. There is a notable difference between his first version (Paris, Louvre) of around 1526 which is clearly indebted to Raphael´s painting of that subject (Rome, Galleria Borghese), and his other versions painted between 1559 and 1572. The main differe

The Allocution of Marquis del Vasto to his Troops
Oil on canvas. 1540 - 1541
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Allocution of Marquis del Vasto to his Troops
Oil on canvas. 1540 - 1541
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Alfonso d´Avalos, first Marchese del Vasto, was born in Ischia on 25 May 1502 to a noble Neapolitan family of Castilian origins. He fought in Pavia (1525) under the orders of his uncle Fernando d´Avalos, Marchese di Pescara, inheriting his titles and estates on his uncle´s death that same year. In 1535 D´Avalos commanded the army that conquered Tunis and in 1538, he was appointed governor of Milan

The Washing of the Feet
Oil on canvas. 1548 - 1549
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
The Washing of the Feet
Oil on canvas. 1548 - 1549
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

This scene from the New Testament (John 13, 1-20) shows the moment just before the Last Supper, when Jesus washed Saint Peter´s feet as an example of humility and service to others. The displacement of the main characters, Christ and Saint Peter, to one end of the composition is due to the original location of this work on the right wall of the presbytery of San Marcuola, where the image of Christ

The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1559
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1559
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian represented the Gospel account of the burial of Christ (Matthew 27: 57-61; Mark 15: 44-47; Luke 23: 50-54; John 19: 38-42) on several occasions. There is a notable difference between his first version (Paris, Louvre) of around 1526 which is clearly indebted to Raphael´s painting of that subject (Rome, Galleria Borghese), and his other versions painted between 1559 and 1572. The main differe

Vulcan's Forge
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1577
Bassano, Jacopo (Jacopo Dal Ponte)
Vulcan's Forge
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1577
Bassano, Jacopo (Jacopo Dal Ponte)

It was Ballarin who discovered what is probably the Prado´s finest painting by Jacopo, and one of his most impressive late works, hanging in the Sala de Juntas of the Universidad de Barcelona, where it was deposited, having been attributed to a follower of Leandro Bassano. The painting appears to be a monumental refutation of Vasari´s description of Jacopo in the second edition of his Lives (Flore

The Abduction of Helen
Oil on canvas. 1578 - 1579
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
The Abduction of Helen
Oil on canvas. 1578 - 1579
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

Helen’s move from Sparta to Troy is described very differently in the two oldest narratives. In the Iliad, Homer describes Helen’s reticence to abandon Menelaeus, suggesting she was kidnapped by Paris. However, in his Ephemeris Belli Troiani (fourth century BC), Dictys Cretensis describes her departure as the willing flight of a woman in love. Both versions are represented in sixteenthcentury Ital

Saint Margaret
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1565
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Saint Margaret
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1565
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Philip II owned two pictures of this saint painted by Titian. The first can be identified with the portrait of Saint Margaret mentioned by the painter in a letter sent to the then Prince Philip on II October 1552. This painting came to the Escorial in 1574 and remains there. The version in the Museo del Prado is later and of better quality. It probably belonged to Mary of Hungary. While it is not

Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. 1628 - 1629
Rubens, Peter Paul
Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. 1628 - 1629
Rubens, Peter Paul

Eve accepts the forbidden fruit from the hands of the devil, who is half child and half serpent. Sitting on the roots of the tree of Good and Bad, Adam tries to stop her. This is a copy of a painting on the same subject that Titian made for Felipe II (P00429). Rubens saw it during his trip to Spain in 1628 and 1629. In keeping with his own concept of painting, he made significant changes with resp

Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The painting is a faithful visualisation of Genesis 30, 9-19 in which Eve is blamed for accepting the forbidden fruit (although the type of fruit is not stated, Titian follows tradition and opts for an apple) and there is a reference to a second tree, a fig, whose leaves are used by Adam and Eve to cover their nakedness. Although we do not have a definite date for this painting, nor do we know the

Apotheosis of Claudius
White marble. I century
Calamech, Andrea (Also Called Calamecca); Roman Sculptor
Apotheosis of Claudius
White marble. I century
Calamech, Andrea (Also Called Calamecca); Roman Sculptor

The eagle and weapons are part of a funerary monument from the period of Emperor Augustus (27 B.C.-14 A.D.). This sculpture was found with many other works in the country villa of Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus (64 B.C.-13 A.D.), a well-known general and colleague in arms of Emperor Augustus. It probably adorned the upper part of a rectangular marble pedestal containing the urn with the general

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