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Still Life with a Maid
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1633
Snyders, Frans
Still Life with a Maid
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1633
Snyders, Frans

This opulent still-life scene typical of the Baroque Flemish school includes a human figure and two animals, as was common in the period, in accordance with the tastes of the clients, whose wealth and prosperity was also reflected in this genre of paintings. Snyders´ clientele were members of the nobility and haute bourgeoisie who were interested in his paintings as testimonies to wealth as well a

Still Life with a Dog and a Cat
Oil on panel. Ca. 1650
Luyckx, Carstian
Still Life with a Dog and a Cat
Oil on panel. Ca. 1650
Luyckx, Carstian

Luycks depicts a table with a basket of grapes, quince and other fruit as well as a hare and various dead birds. At the lower right a dog barking at a cat adds a note of life to the scene. Christiaan Luycks was a follower of Jan Fyt.

A Larder
Oil on canvas. Before 1636
Snyders, Frans
A Larder
Oil on canvas. Before 1636
Snyders, Frans

Snyders invented a type of scene of domestic interiors in which animals are the principal protagonists. Here a dog which has entered a larder and taken a large piece of meat is looking defiantly at another one chewing a string of sausages. The overturned basket of fruit and the broken china indicate the damage caused by their violence.

Cats fighting in a Larder
Oil on canvas. 1630 - 1640
Vos, Paul de
Cats fighting in a Larder
Oil on canvas. 1630 - 1640
Vos, Paul de

With the owners or house servants away, the animals sneak into the larder, giving free rein to their instincts. This leads to a fight. Scenes of animal fights in domestic settings were customary in mid-seventeenth-century Flemish painting. They were also frequent in the literature of proverbs, where they were interpreted as moral allusions to the abandonment of responsibilities and their consequen

Fable of the dog and the prey
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Vos, Paul de
Fable of the dog and the prey
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Vos, Paul de

Dead Game with a Dog
Oil on canvas. 1649
Fyt, Jan
Dead Game with a Dog
Oil on canvas. 1649
Fyt, Jan

A Bull torn apart by Dogs
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Vos, Paul de
A Bull torn apart by Dogs
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Vos, Paul de

As an animal painter Paul de Vos was a follower of his brother-in-law and collaborator Frans Snyders although with a more specialist focus on hunting scenes. Both supplied art lovers and collectors with grandiose, very dynamic and on occasions violent scenes of the type fashionable in the first half of the seventeenth century in the Southern Low Countries and throughout Europe.

Concert of Birds
Oil on canvas. 1629 - 1630
Snyders, Frans
Concert of Birds
Oil on canvas. 1629 - 1630
Snyders, Frans

In the composition, an owl on a branch directs a chorus of fifteen other types of birds while holding a score between its feet. Such images of different species of birds perched on tree trunks, sometimes with musical scores, were known as Concerts of birds and were popularized by Flemish artists in the early decades of the 17th century, especially Frans Snyders. They were quite common at that time

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