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Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a hunting stand with two caged birds as decoys, a crouching dog, and a net on the tree that frames the group. The study of the birds and dog, as well as the bush in the foreground, reveal Goya´s interest in flora and fauna, which he paints with precision. The mitte owl, a nocturnal bird, is quite similar to the owl Goya used in his drawings and etchings as a personification of evil f

Woman with two Boys at a Fountain (“Poor People at the Fountain”)
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Woman with two Boys at a Fountain (“Poor People at the Fountain”)
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A woman and two children collect water from a stone fountain. The bare fields and leafless tree in the background relate this scene to Winter (P0798). Romantic critics gave this painting its name, although nothing in the figures´ clothing suggest poverty. The young mother´s shawl, red stockings and black shoes with silver buckles indicate that she is a wealthy peasant. She looks with sweet underst

Cats fighting
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Cats fighting
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two cats, their fur standing up and their backs arched, spit and face off on top of a brick wall. This is one of the cartoons for the Prince and Princess of Asturias´ dining room in El Pardo. As its narrow horizontal format shows, it was designed to hang over a door, a position favored by the perspective the painter gave it. Goya offers a perfect analysis of the cats´ postures, which he represents

The Grape Harvest or Autumn
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Grape Harvest or Autumn
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Dressed in yellow clothes that symbolize autumn, a young man sitting on a stone offers a cluster of black grapes to a lady. A boy is eager to reach the offered fruit, which is reserved for the adults. A woman stands next to them, holding a grape basket on her head, much like the classical allegory of the goddess Ceres with fruit on her head. Some grape harvesters are behind them, next to the grape

Boys with Mastiffs
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boys with Mastiffs
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two boys hold two large, muzzled mastiffs by their leads. On the collar of one dog is an incomplete inscription reading "DEL SoR", which may mean "I am in the Royal Service". The format of this cartoon suggests that the final tapestry would have hung over a door, forming a pair with Boy riding a Ram, the cartoon for which is in the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Snowstorm or Winter
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Snowstorm or Winter
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

An intense snowfall serves as Goya´s interpretation of winter, which is the subject of this composition. Along with this everyday representation, however, Goya introduces a social theme, as he often did in his tapestry cartoons. Three cloaked peasants return home after what appears to have been an unsuccessful attempt to buy a pig. They carry nothing and their gazes reveal that they are cold and h

Hunter by a Spring
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunter by a Spring
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A hunter rests beside a spring, his shotgun still on his lap. The figure´s solitude and his distracted gaze bring out the peace of life in Nature. The naturalism of the composition and its straightforward representation reveal Goya´s thoughts about the subject of life in the country. Like its companion, Shepherd playing the Dulzaina (P02895), this is a cartoon for a tapestry in the Pri

Shepherd Playing a Pipe
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Shepherd Playing a Pipe
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A musician, traditionally identified with a shepherd by his clothing, leans back onto a hillock in the landscape and plays his dulzaina, a traditional Spanish double-reed instrument. Like its companion, Hunter beside a Spring (P02896), this is a cartoon for a tapestry in the Prince´s dining room at the El Pardo Palace. Both were designed to hang above windows, flanking the tapestry represent

The Injured Mason
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Injured Mason
Oil on canvas. 1786 - 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two workers carry another, who has been wounded in a work accident. The scaffolding in the background reveals the underlying subject as workers´ safety. The painting is an example of Goya´s social preoccupations. In the bill he sent to the Tapestry Manufactory Goya described this scene as: “two men carrying another, who has clearly fallen from some scaffolding, which is seen further off.” The pain

Magpie in a Tree
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Magpie in a Tree
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon was for one of the tapestries to be hung in the Prince of Asturias´ dining room at the El Pardo Palace. Its narrow, elongated format indicates it was intended to be hung in a corner. It is probably inspired by a Chinese screen, which were very fashionable in the eighteenth century. The screen´s representation of exotic birds on tree branches is replaced here by a magpie an

The Flower Girls or Spring
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Flower Girls or Spring
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A young woman holding a girl by the hand receives a rose from another who kneels down to appreciate some flowers. A male figure behind them attempts to surprise the first woman with a baby rabbit he holds in his hand. The background of mountains visible behind them is very frequent in Goya´s genre scenes. For this allegory of spring, the painter eschews the customary representations of the goddess

The Drunken Mason
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Drunken Mason
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A drunken mason is carried off the building site by two of his companions, who cannot repress their smirks at the drunk´s situation: he lacks his trousers and his stockings have fallen down. This is a sketch for the tapestry cartoon, The Injured Mason (P00796), which is also in the Prado Museum collection. The comic interpretation of this work makes it unlikely that it was intended as a soci

Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A tapestry cartoon with two chained dogs, two shotguns, a powder horn, and other hunting implements on a small hill, with a landscape in the background. The resulting tapestry was intended to hang over one of the doors of the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife, Maria Luis de Parma) at the Monastery of El Escorial. It´s intended location expl

The Threshing Ground or Summer
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Threshing Ground or Summer
Oil on canvas. 1786
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya depicts this season with a scene of harvesters recovering from the summer heat by sitting beside a pile of recently harvested wheat sheafs. Some, like the figure on the right, continue their laborious work, while on the left a group of peasants try to inebriate another character whose clothing and stance define him as a typical character: the village idiot. Goya uses popular types for his rep

Painting and Music
Bronze. 1730 - 1740
Bertós, Francesco
Painting and Music
Bronze. 1730 - 1740
Bertós, Francesco

Owing to their ascending composition and their evidently decorative character, it is believed that these sculptural groups, the so-called Triumphs, were designed as table centrepieces. Like its pair (E00505), this group of ten figures represents allegories of the liberal arts through personifications of the concepts that define them, such as Imitation, Design, Study, Time and Harmony.

The Martyrdom of Saint Eulalia
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Michel, Roberto
The Martyrdom of Saint Eulalia
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Michel, Roberto

The saint is possibly Eulalia (292-304 AD), a Christian martyr from Mérida whose terrible torture on the order of the prefect Dacian included being whipped and having lighted torches applied to her wounds. One of the most venerated saints in the eighteenth century, Eulalia is recognisable by the dove which, according to Prudentius, flew up to heaven on her death.Within the sculptural progra

Saint Ildefonso and Saint Leocadia
Marble. 1753 - 1760
Michel, Roberto
Saint Ildefonso and Saint Leocadia
Marble. 1753 - 1760
Michel, Roberto

This relief depicts the two patron saints of Toledo. The seventh-century Archbishop Ildefonso is seen kneeling and witnessing the miraculous opening of the tomb of the fourth-century martyr Leocadia. Ildefonso cut off a piece of her veil and kept it as a relic. A French sculptor working in Spain, in 1785 Michel became director of the Academia de San Fernando.Within the sculptural programme commiss

The Mathematical Sciences
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Helgueros, Andrés de los
The Mathematical Sciences
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Helgueros, Andrés de los

In the centre is a symbolic representation of Mathematics based on Cesare Ripa’s Iconology (1593). Holding a globe in one hand, with the other she uses a compass on a tablet held up by a boy. The flanking figures may be celebrated Greek mathematicians such as Euclid, Pythagoras and Archimedes.Within the sculptural programme commissioned by Ferdinand VI to decorate the New Royal Palace in Madrid we

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