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Boys picking Fruit
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boys picking Fruit
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A boy steps on another's back as he attempts to climb a tree and pick its fruit, while two others watch expectantly, hoping to receive some. This is one of Goya's cartoons for the tapestries intended to hang in the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife Maria Luisa de Parma) at El Escorial. Goya knew the world of children and repeated similar subjects

Children blowing up a Bladder
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Children blowing up a Bladder
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Some boys whose clothing indicates they are from a wealthy family, play in the country, inflating a bladder under the watchful eyes of their nannies, who converse in the background. This is one of Goya's first depictions of the world of children and it already perfectly captures the candor an vivacity of children's games. Designed to hang over a door, this is one of Goya's cartoons for the tapestr

The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. The Hermitage of the Virgin of the Port is just visible behind a group of trees on the right. Worthy of mention in this work are the still life in the foreground and the amorous play among the orange-seller and the Majos. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining roo

The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is the preparatory sketch for the cartoon of The Fight at the New Inn (P-770). It differs from the final composition in some respects, most importantly the name of the inn, which is “The Cock Inn” in this case. A fight has broken out over a card game, with a variety of people of different origins and social classes taking part. Adquirido en

Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas dancing Seguidillas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. In the background, Goya painted the area around the Pontones Bridge, near la Quinta del Sordo, the land and house he bought in 1819. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and hi

The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts a young woman. She is sitting, with a dog on her lap, and is accompanied by a Majo who protects her from the sun with a parasol. This work's format and bottom-to-top perspective indicates that it was intended to hang over a window. It's pyramidal composition, with the figures in the foreground, reflects the influence of classical Italian painting on Goya, as well as h

A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a quarrel among men in front of a tavern which Goya calls the New Tavern. The area near Madrid now called “Ventas,” and tknown as “Ventas del Espíritu Santo” in Goya´s time, was frequented by muleteers, caleche drivers, troublemakers and gamblers, as Goya illustrates here. The cards thrown on the table seem to be the origin of the dispute. The subject recall

The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts five people. The young man in the foreground is drinking from a wineskin while his companion eats a chive or tender onion. This scene has been interpreted as an allegory of gluttony, represented here by the boy with the cane and the blind drinker who are the main characters from the picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes. The di sotto in sù perspective indicates

The Consejo de Guerra
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Álvarez de la Peña, Manuel
The Consejo de Guerra
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Álvarez de la Peña, Manuel

Ferdinand VI, accompanied on the left and right by gowned lawyers and military figures and by a court scribe, presides over the Consejo de Guerra (Council of War), the decision-making body responsible for military issues including the administration of military justice. Flanking the scene are the gods Mars, on the left with a shield, and Athena on the right, together symbolising the opposition of

The Siege of Numancia
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Moyano Villareal, Antonio Valeriano
The Siege of Numancia
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Moyano Villareal, Antonio Valeriano

This scene, with its crowded composition and striking sense of movement, depicts the siege of the Celtiberian city of Numancia (Soria) by the forces of the Roman general Scipio (133 BC). It shows cavalry troops engaged in combat, with a city in flames in the background. Born in Granada, Moyano became a priest in 1747.Within the sculptural programme commissioned by Ferdinand VI to decorate the New

The Council of Indies
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Padua, Juan Antonio
The Council of Indies
Marble. 1753 - 1759
Padua, Juan Antonio

The Consejo de Indias (Council of the Indies) was an official Spanish government body. In the eighteenth century the extent of its authority was reduced to that of the highest tier of justice. Alongside a sizeable group of its members, this scene also includes Mercury in flight, Hercules on the right, and the idealised figure of an indigenous man in the foreground.This relief or medallion and othe

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