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The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In October 1777, Goya received a commission to paint 20 cartoons for tapestries intended to decorate the walls of the Prince and Princess of Asturias´s bedchamber and its anteroom in the palace of El Pardo, north of Madrid, while he was completing designs of other tapestries for their dining room. This would be the third set of cartoons commissioned from the young Goya and proposed by Anton Raphae

Amateur Bullfight
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Amateur Bullfight
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Four young men struggle with a young bull in an attempted bullfight or an effort to control the animal. Behind the wall, several spectators watch this particular bullfight. The youth dressed in red has sometimes been thought to be a self-portrait of Goya. This improvised bullfight takes place in an unlikely urban setting. A pair to The Tobacco Guards (P-788), these scenes of male arrogance contras

The Swing
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Swing
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon, the pair to The Washerwomen (P-786), depicts three women and four elegantly dressed children with their dog on a country outing. Goya masterfully utilizes the figures in different planes to establish relations between foreground and background, with the shepherds´ glances answered by the woman whose back is to the viewer. The peaceful everyday country scene thus becomes a repre

The Woodcutters
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Woodcutters
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two woodcutters with their axes are cutting the branches of a tree while a third, seen from behind, collects the wood. The format of this cartoon indicates that it was designed for an over-window and is thus the pair to Majo with a Guitar (P-743). Goya creates a spiral composition with the three figures, whose different postures and attitudes liven up this realistic, everyday genre scene. This car

The Game of Pelota
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Game of Pelota
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In his bill sent to the Tapestry Manufactory, Goya emphasised the large number of figures depicted here: two groups of three players, each occupying his specific position: forward, midfielder and defender, plus another “twenty-five” figures in Goya’s description watching the match, arranged in different groups and poses. Goya depicts the moment when the ball on the ground has reached the stopping

Majo with a Guitar
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Majo with a Guitar
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a cartoon for a tapestry to be hung over a window, with the figure of a Majo playing the guitar and a background of landscape with three other people. The resulting tapestry was intended for the entry to the bedroom of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife, Maria Luisa de Parma) at the El Pardo Palace in Madrid. Goya's activity as a painter of tapestry cart

The Rendezvous
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Rendezvous
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Rendezvous belongs to a series of tapestry cartoons prepared for the decoration of the anteroom to the bedchamber of the Prince and Princess of Asturias in the Palace of El Pardo. These were commissioned together with the cartoons for the bedchamber in October, 1777, when Goya was still finishing the cartoons for the dining room. The bedchamber and its anteroom were contiguous, separated only

The Washerwomen
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Washerwomen
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Various washerwomen rest by the banks of a river. In the background another one carries her wet sheets towards a washing line tied to a tree, watched by a smiling companion. As a pair to The Swing (P785), these two scenes of women were intended to counterbalance the male arrogance of The Tobacco Guards (P786) and the Amateur Bullfight (P787). Here, Goya presents one of the most naturalistic and be

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