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Hunters Lunching
Oil on canvas. 1774
Castillo, José del
Hunters Lunching
Oil on canvas. 1774
Castillo, José del

This was a cartoon for a tapestry intended to hang in the "chamber room" at the Prince of Asturias and future Charles IV´s quarters in the royal seat of San Lorenzo del Escorial. Mengs appraised [+]

The Wedding
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Wedding
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A beautiful young woman has just married an ugly, fat man. From the side he looks like a pig, but he is clearly rich. Wearing a rather worn dress coat, the bride´s father follows the procession [+]

Man condemned by the Inquisition
Oil on canvas. 1860
Lucas Velázquez, Eugenio
Man condemned by the Inquisition
Oil on canvas. 1860
Lucas Velázquez, Eugenio

Wearing a penitent´s hood, a man condemned by the Inquisition rides a burro, receiving the insults of those observing this street scene. Executed with rapid and impasto brushstrokes favors, this work [+]

Woman condemned by the Inquisition
Oil on canvas. 1860
Lucas Velázquez, Eugenio
Woman condemned by the Inquisition
Oil on canvas. 1860
Lucas Velázquez, Eugenio

Wearing a penitent´s hood, a woman condemned by the Inquisition rides a burro, receiving the insults of those observing this street scene. Executed with rapid and impasto brushstrokes favors, this wor [+]

A Slave for Sale
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1897
Jiménez Aranda, José
A Slave for Sale
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1897
Jiménez Aranda, José

A young, completely nude slave sits on a carpet. The sign hanging from her neck bears a Greek inscription (Rose, 18 years old, on sale for 800 coins) that offers her as merchandise at an Oriental mark [+]

And They Still Say Fish Is Expensive!
Oil on canvas. 1894
Sorolla y Bastida, Joaquín
And They Still Say Fish Is Expensive!
Oil on canvas. 1894
Sorolla y Bastida, Joaquín

This emblematic picture is undoubtedly the best-known work on a social theme produced by Sorolla in his youth. It is also an especially good example of how fully the artist became involved in a genre [+]

Mummy’s Boy
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (G01931, G02092). Its colour and the fact that it did not cover the surface of the paper particularly well made red chalk unsuitable for dark scenes. Th [+]

But if he broke the pitcher
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
But if he broke the pitcher
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Capricho 25. Enlightenment intellectuals saw education as the basis for their social reforms. Goya offers eloquent examples of this concept in the numerous Caprichos that illus [+]

Bravissimo!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bravissimo!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The title, which is taken from the Caprichos, is an expression of praise for a work of art or performance. Goya criticises those who falsely claim to possess superior gifts; the monkey clumsily imitat [+]

There is a lot to suck
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There is a lot to suck
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The subject of witchcraft occupies a large proportion of the Caprichos as for Goya it was the supreme expression of the ignorance and evils affecting society. Among its worst consequences was abuse, a [+]

Correction
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Correction
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Concealed beneath what is apparently a scene of witchcraft lies a fierce attack on the oligarchy of the Church and nobility whose power, far from being based on Reason, makes use of blind faith and su [+]

Don’t cry, idiot
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Don’t cry, idiot
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Here Goya depicts the libidinous desires of monks and satirises the monastic orders, making use of scenes of goblins in order not to provoke the Censor. His commentary on the male figure’s true intent [+]

Is there no one to untie us?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Is there no one to untie us?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The duplicitous nature of relations between men and women is one of the principal themes of the Caprichos. In this case, Goya overtly condemns marriages of convenience that are not based on love: A ma [+]

Your Honour is... well... As I say... eh! Be Careful!... otherwise
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Your Honour is... well... As I say... eh! Be Careful!... otherwise
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This image refers to military figures whose power is based on their position and lack moral and professional authority: The cockade and the baton of command make this blockhead believe that he is a su [+]

One to another
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
One to another
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The abuses committed by the nobility, the aristocracy and the Church on a powerless citizenry appear repeatedly in Goya’s work. The artist’s commentary, preserved in a document in the Prado, is modera [+]

Hurry, they’re waking up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hurry, they’re waking up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

While this drawing acts as the starting point for the print, numerous alterations were made by the artist including strengthening the details of the figures’ clothes and features, which clearly identi [+]

Why hide them?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Why hide them?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This scene is a satire of greed, as a vice particularly pronounced among the elderly, who not even having much time to spend money nevertheless go to great pains to keep it. It is sometimes interprete [+]

It is well pulled up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It is well pulled up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Among the Caprichos’ principal themes is a critique of prostitution. Goya’s comment on this drawing is preserved in a document now in the Prado’s collection, which includes his comments on the other d [+]

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