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The Wedding
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Wedding
Oil on canvas. 1791 - 1792
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A beautiful young woman has just married an ugly, fat man. From the side he looks like a pig, but he is clearly rich. Wearing a rather worn dress coat, the bride´s father follows the procession [+]

Mummy’s Boy
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (G01931, G02092). Its colour and the fact that it did not cover the surface of the paper particularly well made red chalk unsuitable for dark scenes. Th [+]

But if he broke the pitcher
Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
But if he broke the pitcher
Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Capricho 25. Enlightenment intellectuals saw education as the basis for their social reforms. Goya offers eloquent examples of this concept in the numerous Caprichos that illus [+]

Bravissimo!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bravissimo!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The title, which is taken from the Caprichos, is an expression of praise for a work of art or performance. Goya criticises those who falsely claim to possess superior gifts; the monkey clumsily imitat [+]

There is a lot to suck
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There is a lot to suck
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The subject of witchcraft occupies a large proportion of the Caprichos as for Goya it was the supreme expression of the ignorance and evils affecting society. Among its worst consequences was abuse, a [+]

Correction
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Correction
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Concealed beneath what is apparently a scene of witchcraft lies a fierce attack on the oligarchy of the Church and nobility whose power, far from being based on Reason, makes use of blind faith and su [+]

Don’t cry, idiot
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Don’t cry, idiot
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Here Goya depicts the libidinous desires of monks and satirises the monastic orders, making use of scenes of goblins in order not to provoke the Censor. His commentary on the male figure’s true intent [+]

Is there no one to untie us?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Is there no one to untie us?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The duplicitous nature of relations between men and women is one of the principal themes of the Caprichos. In this case, Goya overtly condemns marriages of convenience that are not based on love: A ma [+]

Your Honour is... well... As I say... eh! Be Careful!... otherwise
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Your Honour is... well... As I say... eh! Be Careful!... otherwise
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This image refers to military figures whose power is based on their position and lack moral and professional authority: The cockade and the baton of command make this blockhead believe that he is a su [+]

One to another
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
One to another
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The abuses committed by the nobility, the aristocracy and the Church on a powerless citizenry appear repeatedly in Goya’s work. The artist’s commentary, preserved in a document in the Prado, is modera [+]

Hurry, they’re waking up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hurry, they’re waking up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

While this drawing acts as the starting point for the print, numerous alterations were made by the artist including strengthening the details of the figures’ clothes and features, which clearly identi [+]

Why hide them?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Why hide them?
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This scene is a satire of greed, as a vice particularly pronounced among the elderly, who not even having much time to spend money nevertheless go to great pains to keep it. It is sometimes interprete [+]

It is well pulled up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It is well pulled up
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Among the Caprichos’ principal themes is a critique of prostitution. Goya’s comment on this drawing is preserved in a document now in the Prado’s collection, which includes his comments on the other d [+]

Homage to the teacher
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Homage to the teacher
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The he-goat that appears in the print of the same title in the Caprichos is unfinished in this drawing. In the print the goat’s worshippers offer him a tiny image of a naked child while here an old wo [+]

And still they don't go!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
And still they don't go!
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

French Romantics like Gautier and Baudelaire were particularly interested in this composition, in which they saw an iconic representation of the beings that populate the world of darkness and terror. [+]

No one has seen us
Black chalk, Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
No one has seen us
Black chalk, Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This drawing satirizes the behavior of cloistered monks who, in the privacy of their monasteries, transgress the rules of virtuous behavior and are carried away by worldly excesses, represented here w [+]

Those specks of dusts
Red wash, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Those specks of dusts
Red wash, Red chalk on silk paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In 1811, the liberal Antonio Puigblanch published in Cadiz The Inquisition Unmasked, in which he interpreted this scene as a criticism of the avarice of the inquisitors. Goya here takes the side of th [+]

Tantalo
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Tantalo
Black chalk lines, Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The preparatory drawings for his engravings served to define the compositions, to transfers them to the copper, and as a reference for engraving the final version. He almost always drew the outline in [+]

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