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Herm
White marble. Ca. 150 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Herm
White marble. Ca. 150 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of an Attic work of about 410-400 B. C. representing Hermes in the form of a pillar. In Athens, the different types of hermae included those donated by councillors so they could be situated in a place in front of the Stoa Basileios or the Stoa Poikile of the Agora called the “place of the hermae”. The official nature of these hermae, whose bases often bore honorary inscription

Krater with reliefs of a Centaur Fighting
White marble, Italian marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Krater with reliefs of a Centaur Fighting
White marble, Italian marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

The central part of a late Hellenistic marble krater. The receptacle has high reliefs which show the mythical fight of the lapiths against the centaurs, understood in the fifth century B. C. as a symbol of the fight between Greek civilisation and Persian savagery. The figures reproduce the design which the famous painter Parrhasius made circa 420 B. C. to adorn the shield of Phidias’s Athena Proma

Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Queen Christina of Sweden’s famous puteal is not a parapet (puteal in Latin), but an altar from the garden of a Roman villa (the top is currently missing). The different scenes of the relief show several moments of a Dionysiac party in a sacred enclosure with its commemorative columns, altars, a Priapus herm and a sacred tree with a grapevine. The dance, music and drunkenness scenes interchange wi

Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor
Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor

This Augustean-era classicist version of a late Hellenistic Eros (c. 100 B. C.) once carried a metal torch in each hand. It is an example of the so-called “dumb servants”. In this case, the Cupid probably served to illuminate the bedroom of an affluent Roman’s mansion.

Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Gaius Caesar (20 B. C.- 4 A. D.) was adopted, together with his brother Lucius Caesar, in the year 16 B.C. by his grandfather the emperor Augustus, with a view to possibly having him succeed him. This portrait, created when the boy was seven years old, was conceived to be like a young version of the portrait of Augustus with a hairstyle very similar to that of the emperor.

Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor
Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor

Two ancient fragments with a different origin were skilfully joined in the seventeenth century to create the statue. Augustus, clad in the toga of a Roman citizen, offers a sacrifice with his head covered, thereby demonstrating veneration of the gods. The portrait, less common than the other type in the Prado (E00119), offers a more realistic representation and a more natural hairstyle. Both portr

Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor
Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a statue of Athena, created between 450 and 440 B. C. by the Greek sculptor Myron, together with the figure of Marsyas. Installed on the Acropolis of Athens, between the Propyleus and the Parthenon, the original bronze group represented Athena who was angered by the attitude of the Marsyas who was shown in the attitude of picking up the double flute which she had rejected a

Young orator
White marble. First quarter of the I century
Roman Sculptor
Young orator
White marble. First quarter of the I century
Roman Sculptor

This Roman copy of a late Hellenistic eclectic sculpture (c. 100 B. C.) is based on several models: the body on the Narcissus of the School of Polyclitus (c. 400 B. C.) and the head on that of the Ares Ludovisi (c. 325 B. C.), with the addition of a herm with a cloak from the late Hellenistic period. Restored with a parchment in the left hand, this sculpture of a youth received the name of “young

Herm
White marble. First half of the I century
Roman Sculptor
Herm
White marble. First half of the I century
Roman Sculptor

Roman copy of a herm dating from between 425 and 420 B. C. It was the tyrant Hipparchus of Athens who ordered the construction, circa 520 B. C. of the first hermae of this type, milestones topped with the head of Hermes as the divine protector of roads and as a symbol of fertility. Even in the Classical period, the effigies of hermae usually preserve the beards and heads of hair proper to the Arch

Cicero
White marble. I century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Cicero
White marble. I century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

A brilliant orator and politician, Cicero (106-43 BC) became the literary reference for the values of Roman culture. This bust retains the original inscription with his name and age at his death in Roman numerals. The head is later and reproduces a well known model that was in the Mattei collection in Rome (now in London).

Roman Man
White marble. I century
Roman Sculptor
Roman Man
White marble. I century
Roman Sculptor

Este retrato presenta a un romano desconocido. Con su cabello corto, una expresión facial resuelta y firme, la nariz de curvatura audaz, el mentón anguloso y bien afeitado, encarna el ideal de un romano republicano en la flor de su vida.Además de los retratos de ancianos propios del arte de la República, cuyos rostros fláccidos y arrugados pretendían evocar una larga experiencia política, hacia me

Roman Man
White marble, Limestone. I century
Roman Sculptor
Roman Man
White marble, Limestone. I century
Roman Sculptor

A concern to reflect the inevitable effects of time is clearly evident in the features of this head, which follows earlier Republican models associated with ancestor worship. The subject’s advanced age, wrinkles and the overall physical depiction all add realism and suggest that this image may have been made for a family tomb.

Apotheosis of Claudius
White marble. I century
Calamech, Andrea (Also Called Calamecca); Roman Sculptor
Apotheosis of Claudius
White marble. I century
Calamech, Andrea (Also Called Calamecca); Roman Sculptor

The eagle and weapons are part of a funerary monument from the period of Emperor Augustus (27 B.C.-14 A.D.). This sculpture was found with many other works in the country villa of Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus (64 B.C.-13 A.D.), a well-known general and colleague in arms of Emperor Augustus. It probably adorned the upper part of a rectangular marble pedestal containing the urn with the general

Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor
Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor

The son and heir of Tiberius, Drusus the Younger was portrayed from his father’s assumption of imperial power in 14 A. D., until his own violent death at the hands of his wife in 23 A. D. The realism of his facial features pays tribute to the Republican tradition of the gens Claudia, the patrician family to which he belonged.

Naked Youth
White marble. S I - II century
Lombardo, Tullio (Workshop Of); Roman Sculptor
Naked Youth
White marble. S I - II century
Lombardo, Tullio (Workshop Of); Roman Sculptor

For many years considered a Roman work from the Hadrianic period, this marble is now known to be Italian and close in style to the work of Tullio Lombardo. It is notably similar to his figure of Adam executed for the funerary monument of the Vendramin family (1490-94), now in the Metropolitan Museum, New York.

Juba II
White marble. Ca. 10
Roman Sculptor
Juba II
White marble. Ca. 10
Roman Sculptor

A member of the Numidian royal family and King of Mauretania, Juba II (52 BC-AD 23) was a cultured and fully romanised client king. Educated in Rome, he married the daughter of Mark Anthony and Cleopatra. Juba was a distinguished scholar, geographer and historian. His idealised portraits always show him as a beardless youth wearing the headband typical of Hellenistic rulers.

Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor
Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor

In the relief there is a remarkable combination of different types of plants, acanthus tendrils which end in rose flowers and tendrils with lancet-shaped leaves and fruits, emphasize the truly fantastic wealth of nature. It is in keeping with the Ara Pacis, the altar of peace in Rome (10 B. C.), with its references to the abundance, happiness and peace of Augustus’ Golden Age. Pilasters of this ty

Menander
White marble. 10 - 50
Roman Sculptor
Menander
White marble. 10 - 50
Roman Sculptor

Menander (Athens, 342-293 B.C.) has not been treated fairly by posterity, as almost all the one hundred plays he wrote have been lost. They are known to us, however, through the Roman playwright Plautus, who used them as inspiration for his comedies. The ancient Romans so admired Menander that more than seventy-two Roman-period copies of his portrait are still extant, although they were identified

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