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Saint Barbara
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1772
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Saint Barbara
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1772
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Saint Barbara was a third-century Christian martyr imprisoned in a tower and later decapitated by her father, Dioscoro, as punishment for not wanting to marry and refusing to profess paganism. Goya depicts the saint with her various symbols, with a monstrance in her right hand and the palm frond of martyrdom in the left. She wears a crown as she was a princess. The tower is behind her, and a repre

The Victorious Hannibal seeing Italy from the Alps for the first Time
Oil on canvas. 1771
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Victorious Hannibal seeing Italy from the Alps for the first Time
Oil on canvas. 1771
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Victorious Hannibal is the first documented work by Goya. He painted it in Rome in 1771 in order to submit it that year to the competition held by the prestigious Academy of Fine Arts in Parma where it received an honourable mention. In general Goya adhered to the Academy’s precise guidelines for the depiction of the subject, which is related to the history of Spain. He worked out the composit

Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A tapestry cartoon with two chained dogs, two shotguns, a powder horn, and other hunting implements on a small hill, with a landscape in the background. The resulting tapestry was intended to hang over one of the doors of the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife, Maria Luis de Parma) at the Monastery of El Escorial. It´s intended location expl

A Hunter with his Hounds
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Hunter with his Hounds
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon is for a tapestry to hang in a corner next to a door or window and is the pair to Hunter loading his Rifle (P-5539). Goya creates a perfect fusion between the figure and the natural setting and also suggests the close relation between the hunter and his two dogs, whom he seems to be urging on.The sinuous upward movement of the tree strengthens this vertical composition. The painting i

Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a hunting stand with two caged birds as decoys, a crouching dog, and a net on the tree that frames the group. The study of the birds and dog, as well as the bush in the foreground, reveal Goya´s interest in flora and fauna, which he paints with precision. The mitte owl, a nocturnal bird, is quite similar to the owl Goya used in his drawings and etchings as a personification of evil f

Hunting Party
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunting Party
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya uses a single work to present two types of hunting —on foot and on horseback— and various types of individuals. In the foreground, one hunter shoots quail while another follows his dog, which smells prey hiding among the bushes. In the background, two riders hunt a hare being coursed by greyhounds. The study of animals and movement is this work´s greatest contribution. The white horse is base

Hunter loading his Rifle
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunter loading his Rifle
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon shows a hunter loading a shotgun, with a dog lying at his feet and other hunters behind him. This work is as fine example of Goya´s interest in Nature. He perfectly integrates the hunter´s figure among the sinuous silhouettes of the trees whose vertical elongation fits the format of this composition. The resulting tapestry was intended to hang in the dining room o

The Angler
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Angler
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In this work, Goya represented two different country activities. The background shows hunters, but the foreground has a boy fishing in a river, which gives this work its title. This was a cartoon for one of the tapestries in the Prince and Princess of Asturias´ dining room at El Escorial. In it, the artist resolves the relation of the different planes with greater freedom than in other examp

The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John the Baptist
Oil on canvas. 1775 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John the Baptist
Oil on canvas. 1775 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The pyramidal composition and precise, polished forms of both the bodies and the drapery, all emphasised by the intense illumination, indicate the continuing and direct influence of Anton Rafael Mengs.The treatment of the subject also recalls the works of Goya’s Italian period, during which time he was able to study numerous paintings of this subject. The figures of the children are comparable to

The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. The Hermitage of the Virgin of the Port is just visible behind a group of trees on the right. Worthy of mention in this work are the still life in the foreground and the amorous play among the orange-seller and the Majos. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining roo

Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas dancing Seguidillas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. In the background, Goya painted the area around the Pontones Bridge, near la Quinta del Sordo, the land and house he bought in 1819. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and hi

A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a quarrel among men in front of a tavern which Goya calls the New Tavern. The area near Madrid now called “Ventas,” and tknown as “Ventas del Espíritu Santo” in Goya´s time, was frequented by muleteers, caleche drivers, troublemakers and gamblers, as Goya illustrates here. The cards thrown on the table seem to be the origin of the dispute. The subject recall

An Avenue in Andalusia, or The Maja and the Cloaked Men
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
An Avenue in Andalusia, or The Maja and the Cloaked Men
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon depicts an encounter between a young woman in elaborate traditional costume and her partner, described by Goya in his bill to the Tapestry Manufactory as a “gypsy man and woman”. Accompanying them are various sinister looking cloaked men. This scene of love and jealousy takes place in a park with dense Mediterranean pines enclosed by a fence, a location described by the artist in his

The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts five people. The young man in the foreground is drinking from a wineskin while his companion eats a chive or tender onion. This scene has been interpreted as an allegory of gluttony, represented here by the boy with the cane and the blind drinker who are the main characters from the picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes. The di sotto in sù perspective indicates

The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts a young woman. She is sitting, with a dog on her lap, and is accompanied by a Majo who protects her from the sun with a parasol. This work's format and bottom-to-top perspective indicates that it was intended to hang over a window. It's pyramidal composition, with the figures in the foreground, reflects the influence of classical Italian painting on Goya, as well as h

The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is the preparatory sketch for the cartoon of The Fight at the New Inn (P-770). It differs from the final composition in some respects, most importantly the name of the inn, which is “The Cock Inn” in this case. A fight has broken out over a card game, with a variety of people of different origins and social classes taking part. Adquirido en

The Kite
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Kite
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In Goya´s own words, the scene depicts some young people who have “gone out to the country to fly a kite.” The couples that appear behind the main group show that this subject is a pretext allowing the painter to represent the flirting and gallantry inherent in Majo society. The background building has been interpreted as an astronomical observatory, which was a much discussed project during

The Card Players
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Card Players
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A group of Majos play cards in the country, under the shade of an awning hung in a tree. Behind them, another Majo makes signs to his companion, helping him with the game. Goya uses a new and very rich tecnique here, bringing out the contrasting lights and shadows so as to accentuate the strong realism of this cheating scene. The subject has numerous antecedents in European visual culture. This is

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