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Saint Anne and the Immaculate Conception
Pencil, Pencil, Grey-brown ink, Wash on dark yellow paper. Ca. 1600
Cesi, Bartolomeo
Saint Anne and the Immaculate Conception
Pencil, Pencil, Grey-brown ink, Wash on dark yellow paper. Ca. 1600
Cesi, Bartolomeo

St. Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary, is the elderly female saint kneeling on the floor in the interior of a temple and the heavenly apparition that takes place above her head foretells her conception of Mary, the child in the upper register of the composition in a flowing dress, standing on a crescent moon, symbol of the Immaculate Conception, who in her turn would be the mother of Jesus. Wing

Charity / The Virgin and Saint Elizabeth
Red chalk on blue paper. XVI century
Cesi, Bartolomeo (Attributed To)
Charity / The Virgin and Saint Elizabeth
Red chalk on blue paper. XVI century
Cesi, Bartolomeo (Attributed To)

The rather dry technique of drawing in red chalk on light blue-grey paper suggest the work of the Bolognese painter Bartolomeo Cesi, who travelled to Rome in 1591, thought he may have visited the city before then. The partial copy from Sebastiano del Piombo (c. 1475-1547) on the verso does not seem to be an offset, as the complier of the entry from the nineteenth-century French sale catalogue clai

The Annunciation
Black chalk, Red chalk on dark yellow paper. Late XVI century
Cesi, Bartolomeo (Attributed To)
The Annunciation
Black chalk, Red chalk on dark yellow paper. Late XVI century
Cesi, Bartolomeo (Attributed To)

In her 1983 catalogue, Mena Marques rightly brought attention to the very high quality of this drawing and suggested the style could be Sienese, from the end of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth. Although some Tuscan elements do seem to be displayed here -for example the particular use of the red chalk- the handling has more in common with Emilian drawing of the period. A

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