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Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Following the conquest of Dacia (essentially modern-day Romania and Moldova) by Trajan (AD 53-117), the image of its inhabitants, shown as captives wearing their distinctive clothing, was introduced into public sculpture to symbolise the triumph of Rome. Works of this type, possibly including the present example, were installed in the forum built on the emperor’s orders.

Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Probablemente en el siglo XVII, un autor desconocido dividió mediante un corte longitudinal el torso de la estatua de un jabalí de tamaño natural en dos partes; luego, las completó y montó cada una de las dos mitades sobre un tablero liso de mármol de color. Aún hoy se percibe fácilmente que la cabeza del animal estaba levemente girada hacia la derecha. Originalmente el pesado cuerpo no descansaba

Pensive Muse
White marble, Travertine. 69 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Pensive Muse
White marble, Travertine. 69 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

In classical Antiquity the subjects of sculptures were identified by their attributes or gestures. In this case the figure’s pensive pose suggests that of one of the Muses, Polyhymnia or Clío, depicted in sarcophagus scenes as listening attentively to the god Apollo’s music. Based on late Hellenistic models, this figure was made in the Flavian period, possibly to decorate a library.

Cicero
White marble. I century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Cicero
White marble. I century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

A brilliant orator and politician, Cicero (106-43 BC) became the literary reference for the values of Roman culture. This bust retains the original inscription with his name and age at his death in Roman numerals. The head is later and reproduces a well known model that was in the Mattei collection in Rome (now in London).

Venus
Marble. 80 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Venus
Marble. 80 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Originally in the collection of the 7th Marquis del Carpio, Spanish Ambassador in Rome (1676-82) and Viceroy of Naples (1682-87), this sculpture consists of a nude, Greco-Roman torso with some surviving folds of drapery, completed in the Baroque style by a Roman sculptor in the last quarter of the seventeenth century. It depicts Venus’s birth as she rises from the waves, supported by a dolphin and

Philosopher with the head of Pseudo-Seneca
White marble. Ca. 150
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Philosopher with the head of Pseudo-Seneca
White marble. Ca. 150
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

The body is a Roman copy of a Hellenic original from around 270 B.C.E. which may represent a philosopher of the Epicurean school. The head is a Baroque copy of the type known as pseudo-Seneca. It is mentioned for the first time in the collection of Christine of Sweden, where it already appears as a restored effigy of Seneca, and it does not seem to have been altered in any noticeable manner since

Cup in the form of a kneading trough
Gold, Serpentine, Bloodstone, Enamel. I a.C. century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Cup in the form of a kneading trough
Gold, Serpentine, Bloodstone, Enamel. I a.C. century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

A high cup formed by an ancient fragment of serpentine and a foot and stem of heliotrope. The bowl, with a rectangular mouth, is joined by a ring mount and enamelled leaves to the balustroid stem, with a low knop between round brackets of enamelled gold. Oval in shape, it has a rounded profile and a rich openwork cluster of enamelled gold leaves. The enamels are opaque and consist of light touches

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