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Naked woman
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on laid paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín
Naked woman
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on laid paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín

The drawings in this Album were in the possession of Valentín Carderera, who made copies of originals whose whereabouts are unknown. The naked young woman, similar to others in the Album, shows Goya´s interest in those years in portraying the female body. In fact, it was around those years that he painted The Naked Maja (1795-1800).

Young woman sweeping
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on laid paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín
Young woman sweeping
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on laid paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín

Este dibujo copia el de Goya que se conserva en el Museo del Prado, D7360/1. Sobre el Álbum A de Goya, véase el comentario en, D04184.

Wind. If anyone is to blame in this scene, it is the suit
Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Wind. If anyone is to blame in this scene, it is the suit
Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for the etching Capricho 36, Bad Night (G02124) is part of The Dreams, a series of twenty-six pen-and-ink drawings that serve as the basis for the Caprichos. This type of composition was common in that period among Enlightenment critics. Immediate precedents for some of these works may be found in the Sanlúcar and Madrid Albums, but there tend to be important seman

Young woman stroking her hair
Brush, Indian ink wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Young woman stroking her hair
Brush, Indian ink wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Museo del Prado has four drawings (e/f [D04184, D04183], g/h [D04342, D04342/1], i/j [D04185, D04186], m/n [D07360, D07360/1]) with scenes on both sides from what is known as Goya’s Album A or Sanlúcar de Barrameda Album, as it was rapidly assumed to have been made by Goya in that city in the province of Cadiz during his stay there between spring 1796 and March 1786. The work presented

The Duchess of Alba with María de la Luz on her arms
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Duchess of Alba with María de la Luz on her arms
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The child Maria de la Luz, a daughter of slaves, was emancipated in January 1796 in the Duchess of Alba´s will as a gesture of generosity and grandeur. The drawing shows the affection shown for her by the duchess, who also donated money and left annual income to the girl in her will. The lady is recognizable by her wavy black hair and well-defined eyebrows, as well as by the maternal way she holds

Girl dancing to a guitar
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Girl dancing to a guitar
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This popular scene, traditionally interpreted as being set in an Andalusian context, could also be set in Madrid. Drawn with just the tip of the brush, it stands out for the light wash used to depict the majo in the background. The young woman shown in profile, dancing with her arms at her waist, seems to be slightly moving her feet to the sound of music. Nevertheless, her serious gesture and her

Young woman fainting in the arms of an officer
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on wove paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín
Young woman fainting in the arms of an officer
Indian ink, Conté crayon, Wash on wove paper. XIX century
Carderera y Solano, Valentín

The drawings in this Album were in the possession of Valentín Carderera, who made these two copies of originals whose whereabouts are unknown. The drawing of the fainted woman has been associated with Rosario Fernandez, known as La Tirana, a famous dramatic actress and protégé of the Duchess of Alba.

Majo on a stroll
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Majo on a stroll
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This young woman in fashionable walking dress has a formal relationship with the portrait of the Duchess of Alba in black (1799) and even more so with the young women from the Madrid Album and the Caprichos. The position of the arms at the waist, the veil concealing the eyes like a mask, and the figures of the other women in the background suggest the same context.

Young woman sweeping
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Young woman sweeping
Indian ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Museo del Prado has four drawings (e/f [D04184, D04183], g/h [D04342, D04342/1], i/j [D04185, D04186], m/n [D07360, D07360/1]) with scenes on both sides from what is known as Goya’s Album A or Sanlúcar de Barrameda Album, as it was rapidly assumed to have been made by Goya in that city in the province of Cadiz during his stay there between spring 1796 and March 1786. The work presented

Siesta
Ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Siesta
Ink, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Considering the main characters of the other compositions in the Album, such as the one overleaf, this young woman shown on the bed next to her maid can only be understood in a context of prostitution. It is impossible, therefore, to relate this scene to the Duchess of Alba and her servants, as some historians have asserted in the past. With very few strokes and some shadows, Goya is able to recre

Concert
Brush, Bistre, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Concert
Brush, Bistre, Wash on laid paper. 1794 - 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In the first page of his Madrid Sketchbook, Goya depicted scenes of flirting between young people our walking, amorous affairs in meeting places on the outskirts of the city, and social gatherings. This drawing (Album B, 27) present with obvious humor a common form of entertainment habitual in these cases which consisted in the performance of popular songs. The young woman is playing a harpsichord

They already have a seat
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Prueba de estado de la estampa G02114 (1aedición). En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como moza de silla, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como sentar la cabeza, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Printer’s proof prior to the first edition Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona), before the replacement of the letter “y” with “ll” in “rollona”. Etching and burnished aquatint The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and r

Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 14, What a Sacrifice! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period as dreams were used to represent the world from the perspective of the artist’s imagination without reference to any concrete reality. The print and the preparatory drawing (D04195) are identical except for some background details. We know the subject thanks to handwritten comments by Valent&iacu

Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Caprichos, 70, Devout profession. The harsh criticism set out by the artist in these images, which he ironically titled Devout profession, to openly reveal the scene’s meaning, is directed against ignorant and hypocritical clergymen, metaphorically represented here by witchcraft.

All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 19. The satirical tone that Goya employs in the Caprichos in which he criticises prostitution is applied to both the girls and their clients, the latter depicted as plucked chickens. The artist’s comment on this drawing refers to the young men and women’s inevitable end: “And to think those about to fall won’t take warning from those already fallen. But there is no remedy: all will fall.”

There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 66, There it goes is part of The Carpichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The preparatory drawing’s composition shows a witch riding on a mischievous devil, as does the corresponding print (G02154). Valentín Carderera’s handwritten commentary at the the Museo del Prado in Madrid reads: There goes a witch, riding on a mischievous devil. This poor d

The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 57, The filiation. In the composition, a standing man reads to a seated woman. Both wear masks. Another man scrutinizes them with a monocle while the monkey on his shoulders looks directly out at the viewer, and various other figures appear in the background. The layout of the print does not entirely correspond to that of the preparatory drawing. The reading man has been replaced by a wo

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