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Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Probablemente en el siglo XVII, un autor desconocido dividió mediante un corte longitudinal el torso de la estatua de un jabalí de tamaño natural en dos partes; luego, las completó y montó cada una de las dos mitades sobre un tablero liso de mármol de color. Aún hoy se percibe fácilmente que la cabeza del animal estaba levemente girada hacia la derecha. Originalmente el pesado cuerpo no descansaba

Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor
Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a statue of Athena, created between 450 and 440 B. C. by the Greek sculptor Myron, together with the figure of Marsyas. Installed on the Acropolis of Athens, between the Propyleus and the Parthenon, the original bronze group represented Athena who was angered by the attitude of the Marsyas who was shown in the attitude of picking up the double flute which she had rejected a

Aphrodite and Eros
White carrara marble. Ca. 35
Roman Sculptor
Aphrodite and Eros
White carrara marble. Ca. 35
Roman Sculptor

Double hermae of gods, similar to the image of the two-headed Janus, were created from the first century B. C. onwards for Roman collectors. Here, Aphrodite and her son Eros, the goddess and god of love, respectively, were brought together employing the heads of two masterpieces produced by artists from the circle of Phidias (440-420 B. C.).

Egyptian Priest
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor
Egyptian Priest
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor

This statue and its pair (E00414) were found in the area of the Egyptian sanctuaries at Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli, near Rome. Cardinal Camillo Massimo (1620-1677), their first owner following their rediscovery, had them reconstructed from fragments of various sculptures. This figure holds a whip, which is an attribute of Egyptian priests. The two sculptures probably decorated an artificial grotto

Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor
Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor

The son and heir of Tiberius, Drusus the Younger was portrayed from his father’s assumption of imperial power in 14 A. D., until his own violent death at the hands of his wife in 23 A. D. The realism of his facial features pays tribute to the Republican tradition of the gens Claudia, the patrician family to which he belonged.

Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor
Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor

Two ancient fragments with a different origin were skilfully joined in the seventeenth century to create the statue. Augustus, clad in the toga of a Roman citizen, offers a sacrifice with his head covered, thereby demonstrating veneration of the gods. The portrait, less common than the other type in the Prado (E00119), offers a more realistic representation and a more natural hairstyle. Both portr

Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor
Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor

In the relief there is a remarkable combination of different types of plants, acanthus tendrils which end in rose flowers and tendrils with lancet-shaped leaves and fruits, emphasize the truly fantastic wealth of nature. It is in keeping with the Ara Pacis, the altar of peace in Rome (10 B. C.), with its references to the abundance, happiness and peace of Augustus’ Golden Age. Pilasters of this ty

Pharaoh (?)
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor
Pharaoh (?)
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor

It is not certain that this figure depicts a pharaoh as the head is a later addition, and its only attribute is a small animal beneath the left foot. This image and its pair (E00415) are executed in an Egyptian-Roman style: the elegant, slender proportions and polished surfaces recall Egyptian works of the 4th century BC, while the soft forms of the bodies visible beneath the light clothing are si

Juba II
White marble. Ca. 10
Roman Sculptor
Juba II
White marble. Ca. 10
Roman Sculptor

A member of the Numidian royal family and King of Mauretania, Juba II (52 BC-AD 23) was a cultured and fully romanised client king. Educated in Rome, he married the daughter of Mark Anthony and Cleopatra. Juba was a distinguished scholar, geographer and historian. His idealised portraits always show him as a beardless youth wearing the headband typical of Hellenistic rulers.

Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor
Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor

This Augustean-era classicist version of a late Hellenistic Eros (c. 100 B. C.) once carried a metal torch in each hand. It is an example of the so-called “dumb servants”. In this case, the Cupid probably served to illuminate the bedroom of an affluent Roman’s mansion.

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