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Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Following the conquest of Dacia (essentially modern-day Romania and Moldova) by Trajan (AD 53-117), the image of its inhabitants, shown as captives wearing their distinctive clothing, was introduced into public sculpture to symbolise the triumph of Rome. Works of this type, possibly including the present example, were installed in the forum built on the emperor’s orders.

Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor
Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor

Este retrato de una romana entrada en años y con una mirada que delata seguridad de sí misma impresiona aún hoy por su realismo bien dosificado. En tanto los rasgos faciales autenticos de la retratada, dan la impresión de haber sido reproducidos sin mayores modificaciones, las zonas de piel desnuda, en cambio, aparecen alisadas debido al pulimento de la superficie del marmol, de modo que la repres

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

Hypnos
Marble. 120 - 130
Roman Sculptor
Hypnos
Marble. 120 - 130
Roman Sculptor

This personification of dreams ("Hypnos") is the brother of Death and son of Night and Erebus (the darkness of hell). Hypnos traveled around the world on wings, making the living drowsy. His attributes, opium poppies in his left hand and a small horn in his outstretched right hand, are lost on this statue. Hypnos, or Sleep, strides towards a figure lying at his feet, who was not shown, to wet his

Xenophon
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Xenophon
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

The portrait of the writer Xenophon (430-354 b.c.e.), who was a disciple of Socrates in Athens and later commanded an army serving the Persians and Spartans, was identified in 1949, when a herm inscribed with his name was discovered in Alexandria (120 A.D., BA Antiquities Museum, inv. 25778).Six Roman copies of this portrait are now known: the Alexandria herm, an incomplete portrait from Pergamon,

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

Aphrodite of Cnidus
White marble. 120 - 130
Roman Sculptor
Aphrodite of Cnidus
White marble. 120 - 130
Roman Sculptor

The Roman copy of Praxiteles’s most famous work was made circa 350 B. C. for the sanctuary of the goddess in Cnidus (Asia Minor). As the first female monumental nude in the history of art, in Antiquity the statue already attracted tourism (Pliny, Natural History 36,20). Aphrodite could be seen before taking a bath, leaving her dress on top of a water receptacle, as may be seen in two Roman version

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