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Ecce Homo
Oil on panel. 1560 - 1570
Morales, Luis de
Ecce Homo
Oil on panel. 1560 - 1570
Morales, Luis de

Jesus is shown half-length, crowned with thorns and with a haggard face, parted lips, prominent cheekbones, and moist eyes raised in an attitude of submission to the divine will. His hair, beard, moustache and eyelashes are minutely rendered in a light brown colour. Similarly detailed is the treatment of the tears and drops of blood. The latter, caused by the thorns piercing his forehead and the w

The Allocution of Marquis del Vasto to his Troops
Oil on canvas. 1540 - 1541
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Allocution of Marquis del Vasto to his Troops
Oil on canvas. 1540 - 1541
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Alfonso d´Avalos, first Marchese del Vasto, was born in Ischia on 25 May 1502 to a noble Neapolitan family of Castilian origins. He fought in Pavia (1525) under the orders of his uncle Fernando d´Avalos, Marchese di Pescara, inheriting his titles and estates on his uncle´s death that same year. In 1535 D´Avalos commanded the army that conquered Tunis and in 1538, he was appointed governor of Milan

The penitent Saint Jerome
Oil on panel. 1525 - 1530
Anonymous
The penitent Saint Jerome
Oil on panel. 1525 - 1530
Anonymous

Located against a background landscape resembling those of Joachim Patinir (c. 1480-1524), Saint Jerome kneels in prayer before a crucifix and skull. In this case he is not depicted inside a cave or by its entrance. His red robe and hat identify him as a cardinal while the book refers to his role as a Father of the Church and the translator of the Bible into Latin. Behind him is the lion who accom

The Descent from the Cross
Oil on panel. Ca. 1545
Correa de Vivar, Juan
The Descent from the Cross
Oil on panel. Ca. 1545
Correa de Vivar, Juan

This New Testament scene depicts the Descent from the Cross of Christ´s body (Matthew 28, 57-61; Mark 15, 42-47; Luke 23, 50-55; John 19, 38-42). Joseph of Arimathea, Nicodemus and Saint John the Evangelist remove the nails and take down the Holy Body, while Mary Magdalene laments at his feet and the Virgin is consoled by other holy women. This is considered one of Correa´s finest works. The balan

The Resurrection
Oil on canvas. 1612 - 1614
Maíno, Fray Juan Bautista
The Resurrection
Oil on canvas. 1612 - 1614
Maíno, Fray Juan Bautista

On 14 February 1612 Juan Bautista Maíno signed the contract to execute the paintings for the monastery church of San Pedro Mártir in Toledo. Maíno agreed to a period of eight months to make the paintings, which had to portray the scenes and episodes specified by the prior of the monastery. Despite the agreement reached in the contract, the paintings were not completed until De

Federico Gonzaga, Ist Duke of Mantua
Oil on panel. 1529
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Federico Gonzaga, Ist Duke of Mantua
Oil on panel. 1529
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

On 16 April 1529 Federico II Gonzaga, First Duke of Mantua (1500-1540), apologised to his uncle Alfonso d’Este for retaining Titian: perché ha conienzo un retratto mio qual molto desidero sii finito (because he has started a portrait of me which I greatly desire to be finished). In 1530 a second portrait of Federico in armour is also recorded. Typologically and conceptually, the present por

Daniele Barbaro, Patriarch of Aquileia
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1545
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Daniele Barbaro, Patriarch of Aquileia
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1545
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Described by Lodovico Dolce as a gentleman of great merit and infinite goodness, Daniele Barbaro (1513-1570) was from a noble Venetian family. He was educated to the highest level first in Verona and then at Padua University. A philosopher of neo-Aristotelian leanings, he became friends with important Venetian humanists, some of whom were also portrayed by Titian, such as Pietro Bembo (Washington,

The Martyrdom of Saint Agnes
Oil on panel. 1540 - 1545
Macip, Vicente
The Martyrdom of Saint Agnes
Oil on panel. 1540 - 1545
Macip, Vicente

Masip depicts this fourth-century Roman saint´s second martyrdom, when, after having been condemned to be burned at the stake, the flames miraculously failed to touch her body and she was finally condemned to die by beheading. The logs, still burning and smoking, appear at the martyr´s feet. The lamb she holds in her arms symbolizes her virginity at the moment of her death, which was r

Sailing Boats in a River Estuary
Oil on panel. XVII century
Anonymous
Sailing Boats in a River Estuary
Oil on panel. XVII century
Anonymous

These two seascapes (P1581 and P1582) are traditionally considered pendants. In the Museum’s older catalogues and inventories they are attributed to Cornelis Molenaer (ca. 1540-1589) until 1933. As of 1889, however, it is recorded that Bredius considers them originals by Simon de Vlieger (1600-1653). The highly schematic architecture in the background, the clumsy depiction of the figures and the r

Sailing Boat and Fishing Boat by the Coast
Oil on panel. XVII century
Anonymous
Sailing Boat and Fishing Boat by the Coast
Oil on panel. XVII century
Anonymous

These two seascapes (P1581 and P1582) are traditionally considered pendants. In the Museum`s older catalogues and inventories they are attributed to Cornelis Molenaer (ca. 1540-1589) until 1933. As of 1889, however, it is recorded that Bredius considers them originals by Simon de Vlieger (1600-1653). The highly schematic architecture in the background, the clumsy depiction of the figures and the r

The Visitation
Oil on panel. 1540 - 1545
Macip, Vicente
The Visitation
Oil on panel. 1540 - 1545
Macip, Vicente

This is a scene from The Visitation, with Saint Elizabeth kneeling in homage to Mary, as is customary in Italian art since Ghirlandaio. Zachariah and Saint Joseph stand behind them. The dynamic postures and varied gestures of the figures here denote the influence of Raphael. In the landscape, which owes a debt to Flemish art, Masip depicts the Baptism of Christ, thus adding the forgiving of Origin

Hunt at the Castle of Torgau in Honour of Charles V
Oil on panel. 1544
Cranach The Elder, Lucas
Hunt at the Castle of Torgau in Honour of Charles V
Oil on panel. 1544
Cranach The Elder, Lucas

A hunting scene characterized by a very developed landscape castle of Hartenfels in Torgau (Saxony). Among those taking part are the Emperor Charles V and John Frederick the Magnanimous, Elector of Saxony (at the lower left), together with the latters wife, Sibylla of Cleves (on the right, dressed in red). The hunt never actually took place and the painting is in fact an allegory of good governmen

Perspective View of a Roman Amphitheatre
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1638
Gargiulo, Domenico, Called Micco Spadaro; Codazzi, Viviano
Perspective View of a Roman Amphitheatre
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1638
Gargiulo, Domenico, Called Micco Spadaro; Codazzi, Viviano

This painting was one of four views of ancient Roman life commissioned around 1638 for the Buen Retiro Palace, Madrid. Two of the other works depict a Roman circus and a Roman gymnasium respectively, while the third, now lost, was recorded in 1701 as The baths of Diocletian with a fleet of galleys, which may be a misidentification of a view of a sea-battle stadium, or naumachia. The paintings are

Hunt at the Castle of Torgau in Honour of Ferdinand I
Oil on panel. 1545
Cranach The Elder, Lucas
Hunt at the Castle of Torgau in Honour of Ferdinand I
Oil on panel. 1545
Cranach The Elder, Lucas

Among the hunters depicted here are Ferdinand I, King of the Romans, on the left in the foreground, and the Elector of Saxony in the centre. On the other side of the river and holding a crossbow is the Electors wife Sibylla of Cleves. The episode takes place near the castle of Hartenfels in Torgau (Saxony) where the Elector, a supporter of the Reformation, had the first Lutheran church built. Ferd

Gentleman with a Gold Chain
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1555
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Gentleman with a Gold Chain
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1555
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

The Nobleman with the Golden Chain is the finest portrait by Jacopo Tintoretto at the Museo del Prado and one of that painter’s most outstanding, overall. While historians disagree about its chronology, the artist’s mastery of both the model’s anatomy and his relation to the surrounding space link it to his so-called portraits in motion from the 1550s. In fact, it is even more sophisticated and ef

Portrait of a Woman (Agnese, the painter’s sister-in-law?)
Oil on unlined canvas. 1525 - 1530
Licinio, Bernardino
Portrait of a Woman (Agnese, the painter’s sister-in-law?)
Oil on unlined canvas. 1525 - 1530
Licinio, Bernardino

Modigliani identified the sitter as Agnese, the painter’s sister-in-law, through her resemblance to the woman who appears in the Portrait of Arrigo Licinio and his Family (Rome, Galleria Borghese, inv. 115). As that painting is datable to around 1540, the present work must have been executed between 1525 and 1530 as Agnese here appears considerably younger than in the Rome portrait, by which point

The Agony in the Garden
Oil on panel. Ca. 1545
Morales, Luis de
The Agony in the Garden
Oil on panel. Ca. 1545
Morales, Luis de

Christ’s prayer on the Mount of Olives is the gospel episode that precedes his arrest and the beginning of his Passion and death on the cross. After the last supper with his disciples, Jesus withdraws with three of them, Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, James and John, to the nearby garden of Gethsemane. According to St Luke’s Gospel, he was withdrawn from them about a stone’s cast, and kneeled

Camilla Gonzaga, Countess of San Secondo, and her Sons
Oil on panel. 1535 - 1537
Parmigianino. Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola (And Workshop)
Camilla Gonzaga, Countess of San Secondo, and her Sons
Oil on panel. 1535 - 1537
Parmigianino. Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola (And Workshop)

Camilla Gonzaga, daughter of Giovanni Gonzaga and cousin of Federigo II of Mantua, married Pier Maria de Rossi in 1523, with whom she had nine children. The children depicted in the present work are presumably the three eldest:Troilo, the eldest, who succeeded his father, standing next to the youngest of the three, Sigismondo, with Ippolito, the second eldest, on the other side. This is thought to

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