The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

Refine results
144 results
Isabel de Borbón, Wife of Philip IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Villandrando, Rodrigo de
Isabel de Borbón, Wife of Philip IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Villandrando, Rodrigo de

The daughter of Henri IV of France and Marie de Médicis, Isabel de Borbón (1603-1644) was the first wife of Philip IV and the mother of Prince Baltasar Carlos and María Teresa of Austria. In Villandrando’s portrait, painted a year before Isabel became Queen of Spain, she wears a stiff, sumptuous dress that emphasises her presence and royal status. Although Spanish in cut, the

Philip IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1653
Velázquez, Diego Rodríguez de Silva y
Philip IV
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1653
Velázquez, Diego Rodríguez de Silva y

This image can be identified as that of a king and as a portrait of Philip IV on the basis of others of the monarch. In fact, nothing about the clothes or the sitter`s actions suggests his royal status except the easily recognisable physical features of the Habsburg dynasty, in particular the prominent chin.This portrait and the one who is in the National Gallery gave rise to a large number of ver

Portrait of a Carmelite Friar
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Tristán, Luis
Portrait of a Carmelite Friar
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Tristán, Luis

This image resembles some of the portraits painted by El Greco, who was Tristán’s master in Toledo for a time: the concentrated gaze with which the sitter faces the viewer, and his intense energy unmistakeably recall El Greco´s painting. Nothing is known of the identity of this Carmelite, who is portrayed working with two volumes.

Nativity
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1610
Cajés, Eugenio
Nativity
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1610
Cajés, Eugenio

Eugenio was the son of Tuscan painter Patricio Cajés, who came to Spain to work for Philip II at the monastery of El Escorial. His mother, Casilda de la Fuente, was Spanish. He began studying painting with his father and later moved to Rome (1595-1599), where he discovered two new trends in painting that would largely define the course of art in the 17th century: Caravaggio’s chiaroscuro an

Saint Bruno’s Conversion before the Body of Diocrès
Oil on canvas. 1626 - 1632
Carducho, Vicente
Saint Bruno’s Conversion before the Body of Diocrès
Oil on canvas. 1626 - 1632
Carducho, Vicente

On August 29, 1626, King Philip IV’s painter, Vicente Carducho (ca. 1576-1638), signed a contract for the creation of a cycle of paintings to celebrate the founding of the Carthusian Order by Saint Bruno and its leading members. This colossal undertaking sought to visually narrate numerous episodes from the Carthusians’ history and tradition. It was the most complete commission ever dedicated to t

Portrait of a Man
Oil on panel. Ca. 1620
Anonymous
Portrait of a Man
Oil on panel. Ca. 1620
Anonymous

The 1910 catalogue states that Bredius attributed this painting to Jacop Gerritsz. Cuyp (1594-1652), ascription that was officially accepted by the Museum in 1985. However, neither the typology nor the style correspond to Cuyp`s portraits. Moreover, the oval-shaped panel is characteristic of Amsterdam portraitists. Fred Meijer thus believes that this could be the work of a painter who belonged to

Saint Joseph with the Christ Child
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1650
Martínez, Sebastián
Saint Joseph with the Christ Child
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1650
Martínez, Sebastián

Saint Joseph grasps Jesus’s arm to prevent him from taking fruit from the basket. This action is loaded with meaning, given the sacrificial and Eucharistic significance of both the Child’s violet tunic and the grapes and pomegranates that predominate in the fruit basket. The painter, who is now getting better known, worked in Jaen and at Court in Madrid in the mid-seventeenth century.

Saint Francis comforted by an Angel
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Ribalta, Francisco
Saint Francis comforted by an Angel
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Ribalta, Francisco

Toward the end of the 17th century, Saint Francis’s iconography expanded as many of the classical biographic themes were replaced with more complex episodes -especially trance visions- mystical ecstasies that reflected the new Baroque esthetic and offered, in the case of Saint Francis, a new approach to the depiction of a figure whose life was being presented by his Order in terms of biographical

Saint John the Evangelist on Patmos
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Orrente, Pedro de
Saint John the Evangelist on Patmos
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Orrente, Pedro de

This canvas is a good example of the numerous influences that acted on Orrente’s style. They include his Venetian training, evident in his approach to the landscape in this painting, and unmistakable traces of the Roman Caravaggesque style, revealed here in the figure of the Evangelist, both in the arrangement of the figure and the way it is illuminated.

Kitchen Boy
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
López Caro, Francisco
Kitchen Boy
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
López Caro, Francisco

A table bears various earthenware vessels, a portable stove, a bronze mortar and two peppers. At its corner, a boy looks out of the painting. A sausage and a rabbit hang from above. The boy and objects are depicted with a naturalist technique that explores the descriptive possibilities of contrasting light and shadows with a particular taste for dark browns and earth tones in general.This concept

Embarkation of the Doge of Venice
Oil on canvas. After 1595
Bassano, Leandro
Embarkation of the Doge of Venice
Oil on canvas. After 1595
Bassano, Leandro

This painting, also known as the Embarkation of the Doge in the Riva degli Schiavoni, is dated after 1595, the year Leandro was ennobled, since the signature denotes his knightly status. In the 17th century, two works with similar characteristics depicting this theme arrived in Spain and are today housed at the Museo Nacional del Prado and the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando (n. 546)

Paradise
Oil on canvas. Early Finales del siglo XVI - XVII century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Paradise
Oil on canvas. Early Finales del siglo XVI - XVII century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

La obra coincide con la enorme pintura del mismo tema en el Palacio Ducal de Venecia en casi todos los grupos de figuras, y con ella se relaciona en su composición general. El Paraíso, que ocupa la casi totalidad del lienzo, permite ver en la parte inferior el mundo, que tratándose de Venecia es sobre todo el mar.Preside la gran composición en el centro de la parte superior el grupo de la Virgen a

Earthly Paradise
Oil on panel. Ca. 1620
Brueghel The Younger, Jan
Earthly Paradise
Oil on panel. Ca. 1620
Brueghel The Younger, Jan

Como es habitual en Jan Brueghel el Joven, el modelo iconográfico para esta composición se encuentra en los paisajes de Adán y Eva en el Paraíso inventados por su padre, Jan Brueghel el Viejo, si bien los leones están tomados de "Daniel en el foso de los leones" (Milán, Pinacoteca Ambrosiana) y el ciervo es el mismo que figura en muchas de las guirnaldas de su progenitor. Sin embargo, al contrario

Landscape with Saint Rosalia of Palermo
Oil on canvas. 1634 - 1639
Swanevelt, Herman Van
Landscape with Saint Rosalia of Palermo
Oil on canvas. 1634 - 1639
Swanevelt, Herman Van

The painting entered the Museum as an original by Jan Both, and it is recorded as such in subsequent inventories and catalogues until the edition of 1976. Further, up until 1972 it is described in the Museum publications as the companion piece to Landscape with Carthusian (Saint Bruno?) (P02064) and Landscape with Saint Benedict of Nursia (P02065). In 1959 Blunt identifies it as the landscape desc

Sight and Smell
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Francken II, Frans; Balen, Hendrick Van; Brueghel The Elder, Jan (Jan 'velvet' Brueghel)
Sight and Smell
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Francken II, Frans; Balen, Hendrick Van; Brueghel The Elder, Jan (Jan 'velvet' Brueghel)

This canvas and its companion, Taste, Hearing and Touch (P1404), represent the five senses embodied by female figures in palatial interiors. The sense of smell is conveyed by a woman holding flowers, while Sight contemplates herself in a mirror held by a cherub. They are located in a hall filled with paintings and sculptures, a sort of cabinet of paintings that could reflect an idealized represent

Still Life with Fish and Turtle
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1680
Recco, Giuseppe
Still Life with Fish and Turtle
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1680
Recco, Giuseppe

Giuseppe Recco, a member of one of the most famous families of Neapolitan still-life painters in the seventeenth century, was born in Naples on 12 July 1634. His vast output was consistently high in quality and is characterised by a marked cultural eclecticism, taking in a number of different still-life styles, from Spanish to northern European to Roman, with an unusual iconographic versatility.In

Portrait of an elderly Man
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Tristán, Luis
Portrait of an elderly Man
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1620
Tristán, Luis

This is a work painted with a rapid, dynamic brushstroke that conveys both the figure’s physical features and his personality. It has traditionally been attributed to Luis Tristán, who worked in El Greco’s studio. The latter clearly influenced this image with regard to both its technique and composition

Taste, Hearing and Touch
Oil on unlined canvas. Ca. 1620
Brueghel The Elder, Jan (Jan 'velvet' Brueghel)
Taste, Hearing and Touch
Oil on unlined canvas. Ca. 1620
Brueghel The Elder, Jan (Jan 'velvet' Brueghel)

The dinner guests occupying the center of the composition symbolize the senses. Music and the singing children are hearing, and the young woman petting a mink is touch. The young woman preparing to eat some oysters symbolizes taste, while the monkey pulling on a cupid´s hair also symbolizes touch. Of equal significance are the animals and paintings in the room. The Annunciation on the top of the c

Up