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Hermes-Sakkôn
Marble. 100 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Hermes-Sakkôn
Marble. 100 - 110
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of an Athenian original from the early fourth century B. C. Its archaising appearance responds not only to the hermae tradition but also to the oriental nature of this particular manifestation of the god Hermes, in keeping with a prototype created for a Phoenician sanctuary in the Piraeus, the harbour of Athens.

Narcissus
White marble. 25 - 50
Roman Sculptor
Narcissus
White marble. 25 - 50
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a statue which made about 400 B. C. by one of Policlytus’s pupils. The seventeenth-century additions (calves, arms and trunk) change the original posture of the young man who also rested his left arm on a pilaster. It is not Narcissus reflecting his image in the water, as was previously thought, but a young man in a meditative pose. In some copies, he carries an apple in hi

Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Probablemente en el siglo XVII, un autor desconocido dividió mediante un corte longitudinal el torso de la estatua de un jabalí de tamaño natural en dos partes; luego, las completó y montó cada una de las dos mitades sobre un tablero liso de mármol de color. Aún hoy se percibe fácilmente que la cabeza del animal estaba levemente girada hacia la derecha. Originalmente el pesado cuerpo no descansaba

Diana (Artemis)
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor
Diana (Artemis)
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor

El torso representa a Ártemis o Diana, la diosa de la caza. El delicado chitón, rico en pliegues, está doblado y levantado por encima de las rodillas mediante un cinturón que pasa por debajo de su pecho y no aparece a la vista. En torno al chitón doblado y por debajo del pecho se ciñe un manto, cuyas terminaciones caen decorativamente sobre los muslos. La terminación derecha del manto está algo le

Egyptian Priest
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor
Egyptian Priest
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor

This statue and its pair (E00414) were found in the area of the Egyptian sanctuaries at Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli, near Rome. Cardinal Camillo Massimo (1620-1677), their first owner following their rediscovery, had them reconstructed from fragments of various sculptures. This figure holds a whip, which is an attribute of Egyptian priests. The two sculptures probably decorated an artificial grotto

Silenus
Marble. 170 - 190
Roman Sculptor
Silenus
Marble. 170 - 190
Roman Sculptor

This fragment of a Roman statue shows Silenus holding the infant Dionysus in his arms. It is a copy of a Greek original made between 290 and 280 B. C. by one of Lysippus´s pupils. The realistic features of Silenus, the young god’s master, pave the way for the naturalism of Hellenistic art. The herm was added in the seventeenth century.

Venus
Marble. 80 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Venus
Marble. 80 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Originally in the collection of the 7th Marquis del Carpio, Spanish Ambassador in Rome (1676-82) and Viceroy of Naples (1682-87), this sculpture consists of a nude, Greco-Roman torso with some surviving folds of drapery, completed in the Baroque style by a Roman sculptor in the last quarter of the seventeenth century. It depicts Venus’s birth as she rises from the waves, supported by a dolphin and

Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor
Pilaster with Tendrils and Birds
Marble. 5 - 15
Roman Sculptor

In the relief there is a remarkable combination of different types of plants, acanthus tendrils which end in rose flowers and tendrils with lancet-shaped leaves and fruits, emphasize the truly fantastic wealth of nature. It is in keeping with the Ara Pacis, the altar of peace in Rome (10 B. C.), with its references to the abundance, happiness and peace of Augustus’ Golden Age. Pilasters of this ty

Pharaoh (?)
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor
Pharaoh (?)
Marble, Basalt. 130 - 140
Roman Sculptor

It is not certain that this figure depicts a pharaoh as the head is a later addition, and its only attribute is a small animal beneath the left foot. This image and its pair (E00415) are executed in an Egyptian-Roman style: the elegant, slender proportions and polished surfaces recall Egyptian works of the 4th century BC, while the soft forms of the bodies visible beneath the light clothing are si

Cinerary urn
White marble. 140 - 150
Roman Sculptor
Cinerary urn
White marble. 140 - 150
Roman Sculptor

This urn served as a recipient for the bones and ashes generated by a public incineration ceremony. The round shape at the back of the urn allowed it to be stored in a semicircular niche in the funerary buildings whose rows of such small hollows led them to be called columbari (dovecotes) in modern times. A beautiful detail of its rich relief ornamentation are the two animals on opposite sides of

Cup in the form of a kneading trough
Gold, Serpentine, Bloodstone, Enamel. I a.C. century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Cup in the form of a kneading trough
Gold, Serpentine, Bloodstone, Enamel. I a.C. century
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

A high cup formed by an ancient fragment of serpentine and a foot and stem of heliotrope. The bowl, with a rectangular mouth, is joined by a ring mount and enamelled leaves to the balustroid stem, with a low knop between round brackets of enamelled gold. Oval in shape, it has a rounded profile and a rich openwork cluster of enamelled gold leaves. The enamels are opaque and consist of light touches

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