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They already have a seat
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Prueba de estado de la estampa G02114 (1aedición). En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como moza de silla, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como sentar la cabeza, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Printer’s proof prior to the first edition Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona), before the replacement of the letter “y” with “ll” in “rollona”. Etching and burnished aquatint The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and r

Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 14, What a Sacrifice! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period as dreams were used to represent the world from the perspective of the artist’s imagination without reference to any concrete reality. The print and the preparatory drawing (D04195) are identical except for some background details. We know the subject thanks to handwritten comments by Valent&iacu

Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Caprichos, 70, Devout profession. The harsh criticism set out by the artist in these images, which he ironically titled Devout profession, to openly reveal the scene’s meaning, is directed against ignorant and hypocritical clergymen, metaphorically represented here by witchcraft.

All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 19. The satirical tone that Goya employs in the Caprichos in which he criticises prostitution is applied to both the girls and their clients, the latter depicted as plucked chickens. The artist’s comment on this drawing refers to the young men and women’s inevitable end: “And to think those about to fall won’t take warning from those already fallen. But there is no remedy: all will fall.”

There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 66, There it goes is part of The Carpichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The preparatory drawing’s composition shows a witch riding on a mischievous devil, as does the corresponding print (G02154). Valentín Carderera’s handwritten commentary at the the Museo del Prado in Madrid reads: There goes a witch, riding on a mischievous devil. This poor d

The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 57, The filiation. In the composition, a standing man reads to a seated woman. Both wear masks. Another man scrutinizes them with a monocle while the monkey on his shoulders looks directly out at the viewer, and various other figures appear in the background. The layout of the print does not entirely correspond to that of the preparatory drawing. The reading man has been replaced by a wo

Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 5, Two of a Kind is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in depictions of that period. At first glance, the preparatory drawing might seem to be a simple genre scene—a lady being courted by a gentleman while two older women converse behind them—but the upper-class appearance of both the woman’s clothing (a mantilla and black shawl, a silk lace garment covering her head and

Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 7, Even thus he cannot make her out is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter—social criticism—was a useful tool for both the artist and other members of the Enlightenment, and its intentions are clarified by Valentín Carderera’s handwritten notes at both the Museo del Prado and the Biblioteca Nacional. The former reads: How can he make her out? To know what she is, eyeglasses a

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como “moza de silla”, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como “sentar la cabeza”, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer una escena paródica del madrileño Paseo o Saló

Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 68, Pretty teacher!

Where is mommy going?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Where is mommy going?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 65, Where is mommy going? (G02102) is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition presents four figures accompanied by nocturnal animals. The owl and two of the figures hold up the large nude woman at the center of the drawing. Another wraps herself around her from behind. This placement corresponds to that of the preparatory dra

Bad Night
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bad Night
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 36, Bad Night is part of The Caprichos.The sense of social criticism can be grasped in Valentín Carderera’s manuscripts at the Museo del Prado, the Biblioteca Nacional and the 1791 and 1803 editions of the Dictionary of the Real Academia Española. The Prado’s manuscript reads: This kind of work is done by the sluttish women who do not want to stay home (women of the street w

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona). The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and refers to a foolish, spoilt individual who behaves like a baby.

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

Lads Making Ready
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Lads Making Ready
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 11, Lads Making Ready (G02099 / G00644) is part of the Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period in compositions employed by Enlightenment critics. The print and drawing have different but similar compositional schemes. As usual, Goya reduced the number of characters from five to three, simplifying the composition in a way that resembles his tapestry cartoon from 1870, The T

Of what ill will he die?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Of what ill will he die?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In the Caprichos, Goya assimilated different satirical traditions, some of which were learned and others popular, ranging from the literature of the Spanish Golden Age and moralising texts from the Enlightenment to contemporary material in proverbs, parodies, popular sayings, folklore and theatrical representations, and including also what he could encounter in emblem books and satirical prints. J

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