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Christ Crucified
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Christ Crucified
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The figure of Christ is depicted following the tradition of seventeenth-century Spanish religious painting, although the classical concept of beauty disseminated in Spain by Mengs and Bayeu is also evident. In addition, Goya softened the more cruel and dramatic aspects of this subject, emphasising the beauty of the nude body. The canvas was presented by the artist at the Real Academia de Bellas Ar

Boy with a Bird
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boy with a Bird
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Seated and seen from behind, a boy plays with a goldfinch. The bird’s mate is perched high up on a branch of the slender tree, its sinuous line emphasising the verticality of the composition.This cartoon was for one of the tapestries now in the Monastery of El Escorial. Like its pair Boy with Tree (P-789), this is a design for a narrow panel to hang between the corner of a room and a door or windo

The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Tobacco Guards
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In October 1777, Goya received a commission to paint 20 cartoons for tapestries intended to decorate the walls of the Prince and Princess of Asturias´s bedchamber and its anteroom in the palace of El Pardo, north of Madrid, while he was completing designs of other tapestries for their dining room. This would be the third set of cartoons commissioned from the young Goya and proposed by Anton Raphae

The 12th Marchioness of Villafranca painting her Husband
Oil on canvas. 1804
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The 12th Marchioness of Villafranca painting her Husband
Oil on canvas. 1804
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

María Tomasa Palafox (1780-1835), Marchioness of Villafranca, is shown wearing a white empire-style dress and sitting on a red silk damask armchair, with her feet on a cushion. She is painting a portrait of her husband, Francisco de Borja Álvarez de Toledo y Gonzaga, XI Marquis of Villafranca. The Marchioness received an enlightened education from her mother, the Countess of Montijo.

The Duchess of Abrantes
Oil on canvas. 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Duchess of Abrantes
Oil on canvas. 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Dressed in French fashion from the second decade of the nineteenth century and wearing a stylish floral diadem on her head, the duchess holds a piece of music in her hands, alluding to her love of music and singing. This is Goya´s last known portrait of an aristocratic lady. Its vibrant, rapid technique still recalls the affected, multicolored portraits from the eighteenth century, but its way of

Amateur Bullfight
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Amateur Bullfight
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Four young men struggle with a young bull in an attempted bullfight or an effort to control the animal. Behind the wall, several spectators watch this particular bullfight. The youth dressed in red has sometimes been thought to be a self-portrait of Goya. This improvised bullfight takes place in an unlikely urban setting. A pair to The Tobacco Guards (P-788), these scenes of male arrogance contras

The Holy Family
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Holy Family
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1787
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya expresses the greater importance of this composition through the larger size of the figures, compared to its companion work, Tobias and the Angel (P07856). The wood shavings on the floor indicate that the scene takes place in Saint Joseph´s austere carpentry shop. The Virgin and Saint Joseph —holding his flowering staff— sadly reflect on their child´s destiny, which is foreshadowed by the woo

The Swing
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Swing
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon, the pair to The Washerwomen (P-786), depicts three women and four elegantly dressed children with their dog on a country outing. Goya masterfully utilizes the figures in different planes to establish relations between foreground and background, with the shepherds´ glances answered by the woman whose back is to the viewer. The peaceful everyday country scene thus becomes a repre

Boy with Tree
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Boy with Tree
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two boys are playing in front of a tree. One looks up as he grasps a branch as if about to shake it firmly while the other, in the background, has a basket, possibly for the fruit or birds’ eggs collected by his companion. Its size, similar to that of Boy with a Bird (P00790), shows that it, too, was intended for a narrow area beside a door, or on a pier between windows. This cartoon was for one o

The Woodcutters
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Woodcutters
Oil on canvas. 1777 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Two woodcutters with their axes are cutting the branches of a tree while a third, seen from behind, collects the wood. The format of this cartoon indicates that it was designed for an over-window and is thus the pair to Majo with a Guitar (P-743). Goya creates a spiral composition with the three figures, whose different postures and attitudes liven up this realistic, everyday genre scene. This car

Majo with a Guitar
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Majo with a Guitar
Oil on canvas. 1779
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a cartoon for a tapestry to be hung over a window, with the figure of a Majo playing the guitar and a background of landscape with three other people. The resulting tapestry was intended for the entry to the bedroom of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife, Maria Luisa de Parma) at the El Pardo Palace in Madrid. Goya's activity as a painter of tapestry cart

The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John the Baptist
Oil on canvas. 1775 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John the Baptist
Oil on canvas. 1775 - 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The pyramidal composition and precise, polished forms of both the bodies and the drapery, all emphasised by the intense illumination, indicate the continuing and direct influence of Anton Rafael Mengs.The treatment of the subject also recalls the works of Goya’s Italian period, during which time he was able to study numerous paintings of this subject. The figures of the children are comparable to

The Rendezvous
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Rendezvous
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Rendezvous belongs to a series of tapestry cartoons prepared for the decoration of the anteroom to the bedchamber of the Prince and Princess of Asturias in the Palace of El Pardo. These were commissioned together with the cartoons for the bedchamber in October, 1777, when Goya was still finishing the cartoons for the dining room. The bedchamber and its anteroom were contiguous, separated only

José Álvarez de Toledo, the 11th Marquis of Villafranca
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
José Álvarez de Toledo, the 11th Marquis of Villafranca
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1795
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

José Álvarez de Toledo, Duke of Alba and XI Marquis of Villafranca was the husband of María Teresa de Silva, Duchess of Alba. He is portrayed full length, wearing a yellowish frock coat, a blue-speckled white vest, greenish grey stockings and black riding boots with spurs. The Duke leans on a desk that bears a violin and a black hat. In his hands he holds the score to Four Son

The Blind Guitarist
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Blind Guitarist
Oil on canvas. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The central motif of this work is the blind singer who travels to cities and towns, spreading the news, generally of a tragic or lurid character. Goya depicts the emotions — from interest to fascination— his message generates among the men, women and children looking on. According to Goya, the elegant gentleman in this cartoon was a foreigner. The painter also included unusual characters, such as

The Countess of Chinchón
Oil on unlined canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Countess of Chinchón
Oil on unlined canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

María Teresa de Bourbon y Vallabriga, Marchioness of Boadilla del Monte and Countess of Chichón, was the daughter of infante Luis Antonio de Bourbon by María Teresa Vallabriga y Rozas. She was born inn the family palace of Velada (Toledo) on 26 November 1780, during the distancing from the court to which she was subject, along with her mother and brothers. On the death of Luis

The Washerwomen
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Washerwomen
Oil on canvas. 1780
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Various washerwomen rest by the banks of a river. In the background another one carries her wet sheets towards a washing line tied to a tree, watched by a smiling companion. As a pair to The Swing (P785), these two scenes of women were intended to counterbalance the male arrogance of The Tobacco Guards (P786) and the Amateur Bullfight (P787). Here, Goya presents one of the most naturalistic and be

Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos
Oil on canvas. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos
Oil on canvas. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos was one of the most illustrious representatives of the Spanish Enlightenment, a man of letters, writer and poet, as well as a statesman with advanced ideas. Born in Gijón in 1744, he received his Doctorate in Law from the University of Salamanca. He was interested in art and admired Goya from early on, having commissioned him to paint his portrait shortly after

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