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Ferdinand VII in Court Dress
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Ferdinand VII in Court Dress
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Born in 1784 in El Escorial, Fernando VII was Carlos IV eldest son by Maria Luisa. In 1815, after abolishing the Constitution, he reined as an absolute monarch. He appears wearing the symbols of his royal condition, with a purple, ermine-lined robe, and a scepter with the coat of arms of Castile and Leon in his right hand. The sash of the Order of Carlos III crosses his chest, and he also bears th

Dead Turkey
Oil on canvas. 1808 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dead Turkey
Oil on canvas. 1808 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This canvas is one of a series of twelve still lifes that were listed among the artist’s possessions in 1812. Since his early years Goya included still-life elements in his canvases but there is no reference to earlier, independent works by the artist in this genre. The dead birds and animals in this series are not depicted in the traditional manner as hunting trophies. Rather, the artist focused

The Colossus
Oil on canvas. After 1808
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de (Attributed To)
The Colossus
Oil on canvas. After 1808
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de (Attributed To)

A fearsome giant looms over a valley filled with a terrified, scattering multitude in what has on occasions been seen as a reference to the Spanish War of Independence. Although catalogued until recently as an original by Goya and often considered one of his most unique works, the painting has been the subject of intense critical debate in recent years. This ongoing controversy has involved the le

Dead Fowl
Oil on canvas. 1808 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dead Fowl
Oil on canvas. 1808 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Along with twelve other still lifes, the present work appears in the inventory of Goya´s property made after the death of his wife, Josefa Bayeu (1747-1812) The rich and warm palette and a certain insistence on meticulous technique, perfectly describing the variety of materials, would seem to indicate that, like the Dead Turkey(P00741), this work could date from shortly after 1800.

The 2nd of May 1808 in Madrid or “The Fight against the Mamelukes”
Oil on canvas. 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The 2nd of May 1808 in Madrid or “The Fight against the Mamelukes”
Oil on canvas. 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In 1814, Goya addressed the reagent, Cardinal Luis de Bourbon, offering to make works commemorating events from the War of Independence (1808-1812): "to perpetuate, with a paintbrush, the most notable and heroic actions or scenes of our glorious uprising against the tyrant of Europe". The present work depicts the popular riot of 2 May, 1808, when the people of Madrid attacked the Mamelukes —Turkis

The 3rd of May 1808 in Madrid, or “The Executions”
Oil on canvas. 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The 3rd of May 1808 in Madrid, or “The Executions”
Oil on canvas. 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A depiction of the execution of patriots from Madrid by a firing squad from Napoleon´s army in reprisal for their uprising against the French occupation on the second of May, 1808. The French soldiers are at the right of the composition, with their backs to the viewer. They aim their rifles at the Madrilenes who are to die. The scene´s drama and tension are emphasized by the use of light, which st

Saint John the Baptist in the Desert
Oil on canvas. 1810 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Saint John the Baptist in the Desert
Oil on canvas. 1810 - 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya depicts Saint John as an adolescent, holding his traditional attributes: a cross whose banner reads “Lamb of God.” The artist places him on a boulder, looking up and thinking about Christ´s future Passion. This is an original conception of a religious subject that was quite frequent in Spain beginning with the Baroque painters. The color scheme, which is exceptionally vivid, as well as

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1783 - 1784
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1783 - 1784
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya breaks with Baroque tradition, interpreting this typified subject according to the new principles of Neoclassicism. The clothing no longer flies around the figure, but instead adapts to the body in a natural manner. This delightful and emotive work is a preparatory sketch for the canvas belonging to the main altarpiece of the church of the College of the Order of Calatrava in Salamanca. It wa

Leocadia Zorrilla (?)
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Leocadia Zorrilla (?)
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Ever since this painting entered the museum, the sitter has traditionally been identified as Josefa Bayeu, Goya´s wife. However, the date of the painting doesn´t coincide with the age of the supposed model, as Josefa Bayeu died in 1812 at the age of sixty-five. Thus she would have been fifty years old by 1798, which is the date most historians attribute to this work. The present portrait, however,

Hunger scene
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunger scene
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This drawing related to one of the Disasters was neither engraved nor published. Gassier questioned its authorship due to its scant quality: “Certain details, such as the hand visible at the center, are unworthy of Goya. The copper mark indicates, however, that the drawing has been transferred and printed: might this only have been a printing proof? The present surviving drawing would not have des

Satan’s desperation
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1816 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Satan’s desperation
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1816 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Satan’s Desperation does not correspond to any of the prints from the Disparates, but it shares the same formal and technical characteristics as the rest of that series’ preliminary drawings: the same paper, comparable dimensions and a similar use of red wash and red chalk. Therefore, it is probably a composition that Goya excluded when he began engraving, or that he did not have time to transfer

Big Booby
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Big Booby
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disparates, 4, Big Booby. The big booby was an intellectually challenged giant who danced licentiously to the sound of the castanets at carnivals. In this drawing, he frightens a clergyman who hides behind a manikin or devotional image. In the print (G02172), however, Goya has set the scene at night, discarding the frightened figure’s religious clothing, softening the gia

It’s no use crying out
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It’s no use crying out
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 58, It’s no use crying out.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both s

Appeals are in vain
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Appeals are in vain
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 54, Appeals are in vain. In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both s

Unhappy mother!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Unhappy mother!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

When Goya penciled his tiles on the complete set of prints that he gave to his friend, Ceán Bermúdez, each word was rigorously adapted to the composition and to the critical intentions with which it had been conceived. Such is also the case with this preparatory drawing, in which the woman’s condition as a mother is emphasized by the presence of her young daughter, while the adjectiv

The beds of death
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The beds of death
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

If death has been explicit and omnipresent over the course of the numerous Hunger prints, its name has not appeared in their titles until now. This work may be one of the most expressive of all, as well as one of the most meditative. Goya’s ideas for this composition were clear from the beginning, and the scant differences between the preparatory drawing and the final print are due almost exclusiv

Cruel Folly
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Cruel Folly
Red chalk, Red wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disparates, 6, Cruel Folly. The title of the plate comes from an artist’s proof now at the Museo Lázaro Galdeano in Madrid. Before this state proof with the handwritten title, Cruel Folly came to light, Beruete and Camón Aznar called the plate Foolish Fury because of its protagonist’s appearance. They described him as a furious man with bulging eyes and hair

Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 80, Will She Live Again? This drawing presents the outcome of the previous one (D03983). The volume of prints that the artist gave to Ceán with the title Fatal Consequences of Spain’s Bloody War with Bonaparte. And other Emphatic Caprices began with the premonitory image of a dejected man, defenseless before the terrible circumstances brought on b

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