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Manuela Goicoechea y Galarza
Oil on copperplate. 1805
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Manuela Goicoechea y Galarza
Oil on copperplate. 1805
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This portrait belongs to a series of seven miniatures painted on copper. Unique within Goya’s oeuvre, they depict his son Javier and his relatives by marriage on the occasion of Javier’s marriage to Gumersinda, daughter of the drapers Miguel Martín de Goicoechea and Juana Galarza. This miniature depicts Gumersinda’s sister, Manuela Goicoechea y Galarza.

Manuel Silvela y García Aragón
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1809
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Manuel Silvela y García Aragón
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1809
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Manuel Silvela y García de Aragón was born in Valladolid on 31 October 1781. His father died when he was just seven years old. After having spent several years in Ávila under the tutelage of his uncle, he was married in Valladolid to a young woman from a well-to-do family, María de los Dolores Blanco, and his first son was born there in 1803. Five years earlier, Silvela

Leocadia Zorrilla (?)
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Leocadia Zorrilla (?)
Oil on canvas. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Ever since this painting entered the museum, the sitter has traditionally been identified as Josefa Bayeu, Goya´s wife. However, the date of the painting doesn´t coincide with the age of the supposed model, as Josefa Bayeu died in 1812 at the age of sixty-five. Thus she would have been fifty years old by 1798, which is the date most historians attribute to this work. The present portrait, however,

The Family of Carlos IV
Oil on canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Family of Carlos IV
Oil on canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This portrait of the family of King Carlos IV (1748-1819) was painted in Aranjuez and Madrid in the spring and summer of 1800, shortly after Goya was named First Chamber Painter. It clearly show´s the artist´s mastery at individualizing characters. The forerunners to this complex composition are Louis-Michel van Loo´s Portrait of Felipe V and his Family (P02283) and Velázquez´s Las Meninas

Good Advice
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Good Advice
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Bordeaux Sketchbook [H], sheet 4. The drawing’s modern title refers to the action of a monk who is shown speaking sternly to a boy. His white habit and black hooded cloak identify him as a Dominican, a guardian of orthodoxy and member of this important mendicant order that existed on alms. Nonetheless, the monk is comfortably ensconced on a raised sofa, his feet inserted in a hole that is ideal fo

Bad husband. Album G, 13
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bad husband. Album G, 13
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The flying dog
Pencil, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The flying dog
Pencil, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The Flying Dog is part of Sketchbook G, the first of two sketchbooks from Goya’s final years in Bordeaux, between 1824 and 1828. It is one of numerous compositions in which Goya portrays flying animals or humans. Angels played an important role in his religious paintings, but this artist began to express his interest in witches and other airborne anthropomorphic beings in the etchings from his Cap

The Lay Brother on Skates
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Lay Brother on Skates
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This drawing of a monk skating is number “28” of the album known as Bordeaux II or Album H, which contains the second series of drawings that Goya made in Bordeaux. As in the previous drawing, Goya harshly criticizes the clergy, whose influence had again increased under Ferdinand VII—especially following the end of the Liberal Triennial in 1823. Skating was a popular pastime in 16th-century Hollan

The butterfly bull. Fiesta in the air. They fly and fly
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1825 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The butterfly bull. Fiesta in the air. They fly and fly
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1825 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This drawing brings together several recurring themes found in his work: the impossible dream of flying, the duality of the bullfighting world between the festive and the tragic, and the scenes of absurdity. With its legs spread out awkwardly and unstable, gifted with light butterfly wings and a visible penis, the bull hangs in the air, as a metaphor for both, human instability and the fickleness

This is how useful men usually end up
Brush, Bistre, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
This is how useful men usually end up
Brush, Bistre, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Many of the drawings from Album C depict people suffering the consequences of poverty. Beggars, the handicapped, alcoholics, the mentally ill and invalids appear throughout the first half of that album, offering a panorama of daily life among Spanish society’s least privileged classes during the Revolutionary War. As is customary in Goya’s graphic works, the commentaries that serve as titles to th

They have been known for ages
Brush, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Black chalk lines, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They have been known for ages
Brush, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Black chalk lines, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya’s Album C exemplifies the complexity of his work. Made during the Peninsular War and the posterior repression under the reign of Ferdinand VII, it addresses subjects linked to many facets of that period. Other authors believe this album extends through the years of the Liberal Triennium (1820-23), as they see a relation between some of its drawings and the joy associated with the restoration

Literate Animal
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Literate Animal
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Bordeaux Sketchbook [G], sheet 4. With this drawing, Goya achieved one of the high points of his grotesque metamorphoses of men and animals. The afflicted subject, leaning against a table and holding an open book, recalls the playwright and poet Leandro Fernández de Moratín in Goya’s portrait of him of 1824 (Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes). Unable to understand what he is reading and

They Spend Their Life with Animals
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They Spend Their Life with Animals
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Bordeaux Sketchbook G, sheet 30. In this precisely orchestrated composition, the principal figure, an apparently rational being judging by his gentlemanly garments, lives among animals. These have clear symbolic meanings, representing ignorance, stupidity, and their owner’s distorted moral values. The cat, tied to the bench with a ring, is a noctural creature, while the parrot speaks meaningless c

Man Killing a Monk or an Old Woman
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Man Killing a Monk or an Old Woman
Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Bordeaux Sketchbook [H], sheet 34. Like a picador in a bullfight, a man gripped by fury straddles the back of a monk or an old woman in order to plunge a dagger into his/her neck. As an iconographic reference to the martyrdom of the elderly Saint Apollonia, whose teeth were torn out, the pincers lying at the prone figure’s feet may explain the motive for the crime. In line with the grotesque humor

Monks in procession
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Monks in procession
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Processions are a frequent element in Goya´s last works, and are always depicted with a noticeably dark tone, such as I the The San Isidro Pilgrimage, one of his Black Paintings. Here the monks hide their faces, while walking together forming a crowd; these are two common resources used by Goya to express lying, submission and the absence of critical thinking. The image shows his technical mastery

War (Album H, 15)
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
War (Album H, 15)
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The last of the albums produced in Bordeaux offers a succession of untitled scenes in which an apparent representation of reality is combined with fantasy. This woman, covered with a mantle, armed with a sword and shield, and flying on the back of a great bat, recalls the scenes of witchcraft and madness depicted in the Caprichos, as well as the evil monster that populated the Disasters series. Th

They eat a lot
Pencil on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They eat a lot
Pencil on grey laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Several drawings in these sketchbooks predominantly feature clergymen, all of which have a satirical tone. In this case, a friar laboriously prepares to relieve himself, consequentially, as Goya´s title suggest, because of his gluttony. In contradiction to the private nature of this deed, an observant figure can be seen in the background. His smile contrasts with the grave effort made by the prota

The Enema
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Enema
Pencil on laid paper. 1824 - 1828
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Bordeaux Sketchbook [H], sheet 42. Once again Goya makes use of an enema, as in Capricho 58, Swallow That, Dog. The manuscript commentary in the Prado on that print states: "he who lives among men will be irredeemably syringed". While in that image it was monks of various orders about to administer the enema to the terrified victim, here they are three women -young, mature, and old- who laugh as t

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