The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

RDF
Refine results
10 results
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian represented the Gospel account of the burial of Christ (Matthew 27: 57-61; Mark 15: 44-47; Luke 23: 50-54; John 19: 38-42) on several occasions. There is a notable difference between his first version (Paris, Louvre) of around 1526 which is clearly indebted to Raphael´s painting of that subject (Rome, Galleria Borghese), and his other versions painted between 1559 and 1572. The main differe

Philip II offering the Infante Fernando to Victory
Oil on canvas. 1573 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Philip II offering the Infante Fernando to Victory
Oil on canvas. 1573 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

This painting commemorates events that took place in 1571: the defeat of the Turkish armada at Lepanto on October 7, and the birth of the infante Fernando, heir to the throne, on December 5th. The proximity of these two events led them to be viewed repeatedly as gifts from Heaven in circles close to the monarch. Thus, a letter from Luis de Requesens, Governer of Milan to Sancho de Padilla, dated D

Christ as the Gardener
Oil on canvas. 1553
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Christ as the Gardener
Oil on canvas. 1553
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

In 1553 Titian painted a Noli me tangere for Mary of Hungary, the Emperor Charles V’s sister, which the Spanish Ambassador in Venice described as a “work very worthy of being seen”. Following its arrival in Spain its condition deteriorated to the point that on 4 July 1566 Philip II instructed the painter Juan Navarrete “El Mudo” to cut out Christ’s head, which was the best preserved part. The rest

The Virgin Dolorosa with her Hands apart
Oil. 1555
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Virgin Dolorosa with her Hands apart
Oil. 1555
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

We know from a letter of 30 June 1553 from the Spanish Ambassador in Venice that Titian was waiting for instructions from the emperor to paint a panel of Our Lady the same as the Ecce Homo which Your Majesty has. This painting was completed in 1554 and can be identified with The Virgin Dolorosa with her Hands joined (P443). In another letter of 1554 there is a reference to another Virgin Dolorosa

The Virgin and Child between Saints Anthony of Padua and Roch
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1510
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Virgin and Child between Saints Anthony of Padua and Roch
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1510
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

This work was first recorded in 1641 as a work by Titian belonging to the Duke of Medina de las Torres in Naples. It was, however, attributed to Giorgione for centuries until Wilhelm Schmidt again attributed it to Titian in 1904. Most specialists now share Schmidt’s opinion, except for Charles Hope, who considers it the work of an artist yet to be determined, and Paul Holberton, who believes it to

Religion assisted by Spain
Oil on canvas. 1572 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Religion assisted by Spain
Oil on canvas. 1572 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Religion succoured by Spain (c.1572-75), belongs to the last group of paintings that Titian sent to Philip II in 1576, one year before the artist’s death. As such, it is almost seven decades older than the earliest work by Titian, The Virgin and Child between Saint Anthony of Padua and Saint Roch (P288), c.1510. Contemplating the two together allows viewers to recognise and admire Titian’s excepti

The Virgin in Contemplation
Oil on canvas. XVI century
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Virgin in Contemplation
Oil on canvas. XVI century
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Mater Dolorosa with Clasped Hands
Oil on panel. 1554
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Mater Dolorosa with Clasped Hands
Oil on panel. 1554
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

We know from a letter of 30 June 1553 from the Spanish Ambassador in Venice that Titian was waiting for instructions from the emperor to paint a panel of Our Lady the same as the Ecce Homo which Your Majesty has. This painting was completed in 1554 and can be identified with The Virgin Dolorosa with her Hands joined (P443). In another letter of 1554 there is a reference to another Virgin Dolorosa

Saint Catherine of Alexandria
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Saint Catherine of Alexandria
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Although no entirely autograph painting of this subject survives, Titian painted it on numerous occasions, both as a single figure and within larger compositions. In 1648, for example, Ridolfi mentions at least tre inventioni di Santa Caterina martire, che si sposa a Christo diversamente dipinte, belonging to Cristofo and Francesco Muselli in Verona. The first (lost) image of the saint as a single

The Virgin and Child with Saints Dorothy and George
Oil on panel. 1515 - 1518
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Virgin and Child with Saints Dorothy and George
Oil on panel. 1515 - 1518
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The authorship, dating and iconography of this work are all controversial. It was described as being by Titian in the Libro de entregas of the Escorial in 1593, an opinion maintained by Sigüenza but not by Cassiano dal Pozzo, who attributed it in 1626 to Giorgione, and it was described as such in 1839 when it entered the Museo del Prado. However, since Crowe and Cavalcaselle, it has been attr

Up