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Portrait of a Woman
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (And Workshop)
Portrait of a Woman
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (And Workshop)

Previously catalogued as Portrait of Titian’s Daughter Lavinia Vecellio by Veronese, this canvas of an unknown sitter was painted in Titian’s studio. The lively face, probably painted by Titian himself, contrasts with the routine treatment of the clothing, which is the work of assistants.

Federico Gonzaga, Ist Duke of Mantua
Oil on panel. 1529
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Federico Gonzaga, Ist Duke of Mantua
Oil on panel. 1529
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

On 16 April 1529 Federico II Gonzaga, First Duke of Mantua (1500-1540), apologised to his uncle Alfonso d’Este for retaining Titian: perché ha conienzo un retratto mio qual molto desidero sii finito (because he has started a portrait of me which I greatly desire to be finished). In 1530 a second portrait of Federico in armour is also recorded. Typologically and conceptually, the present por

Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1549 - 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (Workshop Of)
Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1549 - 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (Workshop Of)

Philip II (r. 1556-98) was Titian´s most important patron, and together they forged one of the most fruitful artistic relationships of the European Renaissance. Philip surpassed all of the Venetian painter´s previous patrons both in the number of commissions and in their variety. Unlike his father, Emperor Charles V (r. 1519-56), Philip was not satisfied with only portraits and devotional works; h

The Agony in the Garden
Oil on canvas. 1558 - 1562
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Agony in the Garden
Oil on canvas. 1558 - 1562
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

On 13 July 1558, Philip II asked Titian to make haste with the completion of an Agony in the Garden which the artist had agreed to finish one year earlier, but which was only sent to the monarch in 1562 along with The Rape of Europa. Titian sent the king another painting of the same subject, probably in 1563, and Philip sent both to the Escorial where the second is still to be found. While the two

Empress Isabella of Portugal
Oil on canvas. 1548
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Empress Isabella of Portugal
Oil on canvas. 1548
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The portraits that Titian painted of Isabella (1503-1539), daughter of King Manuel of Portugal and wife of Charles V from 1526, constitute one of the most moving episodes within Renaissance art. When the empress died, Charles found that he did not have her portrait, so he tried to recover the one that his deceased wife had sent years earlier to Margaret of Austria. In November 1539 he received thi

The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1572
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian represented the Gospel account of the burial of Christ (Matthew 27: 57-61; Mark 15: 44-47; Luke 23: 50-54; John 19: 38-42) on several occasions. There is a notable difference between his first version (Paris, Louvre) of around 1526 which is clearly indebted to Raphael´s painting of that subject (Rome, Galleria Borghese), and his other versions painted between 1559 and 1572. The main differe

The Adoration of the Magi
Oil on canvas. XVI century
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Adoration of the Magi
Oil on canvas. XVI century
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1559
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
The Burial of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1559
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian represented the Gospel account of the burial of Christ (Matthew 27: 57-61; Mark 15: 44-47; Luke 23: 50-54; John 19: 38-42) on several occasions. There is a notable difference between his first version (Paris, Louvre) of around 1526 which is clearly indebted to Raphael´s painting of that subject (Rome, Galleria Borghese), and his other versions painted between 1559 and 1572. The main differe

Saint Catherine of Alexandria
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Saint Catherine of Alexandria
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1560
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Although no entirely autograph painting of this subject survives, Titian painted it on numerous occasions, both as a single figure and within larger compositions. In 1648, for example, Ridolfi mentions at least tre inventioni di Santa Caterina martire, che si sposa a Christo diversamente dipinte, belonging to Cristofo and Francesco Muselli in Verona. The first (lost) image of the saint as a single

Sisyphus
Oil on canvas. 1548 - 1549
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Sisyphus
Oil on canvas. 1548 - 1549
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The literary source for the Furies is Ovid´s Metamorphoses (IV, 447-464) and Virgil´s Aeneid (VI, 457-8), which recounts the eternal sufferings in Hades of Tityus, whose liver was devoured by a vulture as a punishment for having raped Latona; Tantalus, condemned to try to reach food and drink in vain for having killed and cooked his son Pelops as a banquet for the gods; Sisyphus, founder and king

Emperor Charles V with a Dog
Oil on canvas. 1533
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Emperor Charles V with a Dog
Oil on canvas. 1533
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The period between 1530 and 1533 was crucial for the formulation of the image of Charles V. The image that ultimately proved most influential was invented by Jacob Seisenegger who painted five full-length portraits of Charles V between 1530 and 1532, creating a totally innovative typology for the depiction of the Emperor but one that had numerous precedents in German art (Cranach, Strigel, Amberge

Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1551
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1551
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Philip II was Titian’s most important patron, and the pair’s artistic relationship was one of the most fecund of the Renaissance. They met twice while Philip was still a prince, in Milan (December 1548-January 1549) and Augsburg (November 1550-1551), and Titian painted the prince’s portrait on both occasions. On 29 January 1549 Philip paid the painter 1000 escudos for certain portraits he paints a

Philip II offering the Infante Fernando to Victory
Oil on canvas. 1573 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Philip II offering the Infante Fernando to Victory
Oil on canvas. 1573 - 1575
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

This painting commemorates events that took place in 1571: the defeat of the Turkish armada at Lepanto on October 7, and the birth of the infante Fernando, heir to the throne, on December 5th. The proximity of these two events led them to be viewed repeatedly as gifts from Heaven in circles close to the monarch. Thus, a letter from Luis de Requesens, Governer of Milan to Sancho de Padilla, dated D

Daniele Barbaro, Patriarch of Aquileia
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1545
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Daniele Barbaro, Patriarch of Aquileia
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1545
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Described by Lodovico Dolce as a gentleman of great merit and infinite goodness, Daniele Barbaro (1513-1570) was from a noble Venetian family. He was educated to the highest level first in Verona and then at Padua University. A philosopher of neo-Aristotelian leanings, he became friends with important Venetian humanists, some of whom were also portrayed by Titian, such as Pietro Bembo (Washington,

Self-portrait
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1562
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Self-portrait
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1562
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

Titian painted his first self-portrait before leaving for Rome in 1545. However, it was after his Roman stay that he showed the most interest in disseminating his image in order to fully establish his position in a context of intense rivalry with Michelangelo. In 1549 Paolo Giovio acquired a self-portrait by the artist for his Museo in Como, while in 1550 the painter had another one sent to Charle

Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Adam and Eve
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The painting is a faithful visualisation of Genesis 30, 9-19 in which Eve is blamed for accepting the forbidden fruit (although the type of fruit is not stated, Titian follows tradition and opts for an apple) and there is a reference to a second tree, a fig, whose leaves are used by Adam and Eve to cover their nakedness. Although we do not have a definite date for this painting, nor do we know the

Knight with a Clock
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Knight with a Clock
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1550
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

The unknown subject of this portrait has been identified, inconclusively, as either Gianello della Torre, a clockmaker at the Spanish court, or some member of the Cuccini family. Whether or not the figure is a Knight of Malta has been questioned due to supposed anomalies in the cross sewn onto his clothing, despite the fact that it is an enhanced octagonal cross of the Order of Malta, made of whit

Christ as the Gardener
Oil on canvas. 1553
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Christ as the Gardener
Oil on canvas. 1553
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

In 1553 Titian painted a Noli me tangere for Mary of Hungary, the Emperor Charles V’s sister, which the Spanish Ambassador in Venice described as a “work very worthy of being seen”. Following its arrival in Spain its condition deteriorated to the point that on 4 July 1566 Philip II instructed the painter Juan Navarrete “El Mudo” to cut out Christ’s head, which was the best preserved part. The rest

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