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The Old Women are filled with laughter because they know he hasn’t a penny
Brush, Pencil, Indian ink wash, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Old Women are filled with laughter because they know he hasn’t a penny
Brush, Pencil, Indian ink wash, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for the etching Capricho 5, Two of a Kind (G02093) is part of The Dreams, a series of twenty-six pen-and-ink drawings that serve as the basis for the Caprichos in the first stage of its creation. The subject matter was common in depictions of that period. At first glance, the preparatory drawing might seem to be a simple genre scene—a lady being courted by a gentleman whil

Since I told him se moves nicely, he can't speak without wriggling
Black chalk, Pencil, Bistre, Iron gall ink, Wash on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Since I told him se moves nicely, he can't speak without wriggling
Black chalk, Pencil, Bistre, Iron gall ink, Wash on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for the etching Capricho 7, God forgive her: Even thus he cannot make her out (G02095) is part of The Dreams, a series of twenty-six pen-and-ink drawings that serve as the basis for the Caprichos in the first stage of its creation. The composition is similar to the final print, although two figures and the construction in the background are missing from the latter. The su

The Illness of Reason
Black chalk, Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Illness of Reason
Black chalk, Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for the etching, Capricho 50. The Chinchillas (G02138). The group of twenty-six pen drawings that constitute the basis for The Caprichos in its initial phase, make up the Dreams series. Beginning with Dream 1, The Author Dreaming, they draw on a customary 18th-century subject. The plate mark indicates that this drawing was transferred, but no proof is known, and the handwritt

The Worst is to beg
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper, continuous paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Worst is to beg
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper, continuous paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for the print Disasters of War, 55, The Worst is to beg. One of Goya’s most singular conceptual contributions in his series of prints, Disasters of War, is his manner of representing the role of women in the conflict. They sometimes appear as heroines, but are more often depicted as victims of abuse and violence. In his desire to convey the war’s dire consequences for all lev

There was nothing to be done and he died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There was nothing to be done and he died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 53, There was nothing to be done and he died.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the

Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 5, Two of a Kind is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in depictions of that period. At first glance, the preparatory drawing might seem to be a simple genre scene—a lady being courted by a gentleman while two older women converse behind them—but the upper-class appearance of both the woman’s clothing (a mantilla and black shawl, a silk lace garment covering her head and

Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 7, Even thus he cannot make her out is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter—social criticism—was a useful tool for both the artist and other members of the Enlightenment, and its intentions are clarified by Valentín Carderera’s handwritten notes at both the Museo del Prado and the Biblioteca Nacional. The former reads: How can he make her out? To know what she is, eyeglasses a

The Worst is to beg
Etching, Wash, Burnisher on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Worst is to beg
Etching, Wash, Burnisher on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 55, The Worst is to beg. One of Goya’s most singular conceptual contributions in his series of prints, Disasters of War, is his manner of representing the role of women in the conflict. They sometimes appear as heroines, but are more often depicted as victims of abuse and violence. In his desire to convey the war’s dire consequences for all levels of the population, he made women

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