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Aphrodite and Eros
White carrara marble. Ca. 35
Roman Sculptor
Aphrodite and Eros
White carrara marble. Ca. 35
Roman Sculptor

Double hermae of gods, similar to the image of the two-headed Janus, were created from the first century B. C. onwards for Roman collectors. Here, Aphrodite and her son Eros, the goddess and god of love, respectively, were brought together employing the heads of two masterpieces produced by artists from the circle of Phidias (440-420 B. C.).

The Philosopher Hermarchus of Mytilene
White marble. 125 - 150
Roman Sculptor
The Philosopher Hermarchus of Mytilene
White marble. 125 - 150
Roman Sculptor

Copia romana de un original griego helenístico de h. 260-250 a. C. del retrato del filósofo epicúreo, realizado en Atenas hacia la época de su muerte. El aspecto de Hermarco se conoce y está documentado gracias a su retrato de busto hallado en Pompeya, identificado mediante inscripción, cuya cabeza pertenecía a una estatua sedente de la que existe en Florencia un ejemplar casi completo (Blanco y L

Xenophon
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Xenophon
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

The portrait of the writer Xenophon (430-354 b.c.e.), who was a disciple of Socrates in Athens and later commanded an army serving the Persians and Spartans, was identified in 1949, when a herm inscribed with his name was discovered in Alexandria (120 A.D., BA Antiquities Museum, inv. 25778).Six Roman copies of this portrait are now known: the Alexandria herm, an incomplete portrait from Pergamon,

Philosopher with the head of Pseudo-Seneca
White marble. Ca. 150
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Philosopher with the head of Pseudo-Seneca
White marble. Ca. 150
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

The body is a Roman copy of a Hellenic original from around 270 B.C.E. which may represent a philosopher of the Epicurean school. The head is a Baroque copy of the type known as pseudo-Seneca. It is mentioned for the first time in the collection of Christine of Sweden, where it already appears as a restored effigy of Seneca, and it does not seem to have been altered in any noticeable manner since

Cinerary urn
White marble. 140 - 150
Roman Sculptor
Cinerary urn
White marble. 140 - 150
Roman Sculptor

This urn served as a recipient for the bones and ashes generated by a public incineration ceremony. The round shape at the back of the urn allowed it to be stored in a semicircular niche in the funerary buildings whose rows of such small hollows led them to be called columbari (dovecotes) in modern times. A beautiful detail of its rich relief ornamentation are the two animals on opposite sides of

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