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Roman Man
White marble. Ca. 1550
Anonymous
Roman Man
White marble. Ca. 1550
Anonymous

En este medallón se representa la cabeza de un joven imberbe hasta la zona clavicular. Su pelo corto se articula en ondulados mechones falciformes que se arremolinan movidos sobre la frente. Aunque la estructura y medidas del tondo son muy similares a las de los medallones lombardos, como los que ornamentan la capilla Colleoni o la Certosa de Pavía, la apariencia y estilo del rostro revela su vinc

Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Dacian of the type from Trajan's Forum
Africano marble, Bigio antico, Marmo greco scritto. 120 - 130
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Following the conquest of Dacia (essentially modern-day Romania and Moldova) by Trajan (AD 53-117), the image of its inhabitants, shown as captives wearing their distinctive clothing, was introduced into public sculpture to symbolise the triumph of Rome. Works of this type, possibly including the present example, were installed in the forum built on the emperor’s orders.

''Hispania''. Female bust
Africano marble, White marble. II century
Anonymous
''Hispania''. Female bust
Africano marble, White marble. II century
Anonymous

This female bust, identified by Hübner in the inventories of the Alcázar, represents Hispania, the personification of Spain, according to a type developed in the time of Philip II. Her hair bears similarities to the “towering” haridos seen on Roman matrons of the middle of the 2nd century A.D., but is more heavily ornamented with curls. The workmanship and proportions of the head bring

The Emperor Lucius Verus (?)
White marble, Travertine, Giallo antico marble, Vert antique. XVII century
Anonymous
The Emperor Lucius Verus (?)
White marble, Travertine, Giallo antico marble, Vert antique. XVII century
Anonymous

This relief is similar to a gem (known from an engraving) that was in Cardinal Massimo’s collection and subsequently that of the Marquis of El Carpio. It exemplifies the survival of classical models which were recreated in the early Modern Age to decorate palaces. Made from meticulously carved, coloured marbles, the work’s chromatic variety brings it close to painting in a deliberate and striking

Philip II's Tabletop
Africano marble, White marble, Agate, Jasper, Lapis lazuli. Before 1587
Roman Sculptor
Philip II's Tabletop
Africano marble, White marble, Agate, Jasper, Lapis lazuli. Before 1587
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop was sent from Rome by Cardinal Alessandrino, nephew of Pope Pius V, to Philip II of Spain in 1587. Of unusual proportions, it is designed to create the impression that the inlay is made of precious stones. The bronze mounts date from the reign of Isabel II. Like the Table of don Rodrigo Calderon (O00448), this tabletop rests on four of the twelve lions that Velazquez commissioned fro

Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop belonged to Rodrigo Calderon, secretary to Philip III, who seems to have acquired it by somewhat unethical means. Its decoration of military motifs suggests that it is related to the victory at Lepanto. After Calderon´s death in 1621 it was acquired by Philip IV at the posthumous sale of his possessions. The table is supported by four bronze lions, three of them commissioned by Velaz

Tabletop
Marble, Hardstone, Alabaster, Coral. Ca. 1570
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop
Marble, Hardstone, Alabaster, Coral. Ca. 1570
Roman Sculptor

This is considered to be the earliest tabletop of this kind in Spain to judge from the materials used and the similarity of the decoration to other such tabletops in Florence (Museo degli Argenti). The geometrical decoration recalls Roman work of this period, although the relationship with drawings by the Florentine architect G.A. Dosio and others by Niccoló Gaddi may also suggest a Florent

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