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Tabletop with central interlaced Motif
Paragone, Jasper, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Early XVII century
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop with central interlaced Motif
Paragone, Jasper, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Early XVII century
Roman Sculptor

This is rare type of tabletop that combines Roman Mannerist elements such as the border with pre-Baroque ones such as the exuberant floral and foliate motif that fills the centre. This motif replaces the central alabaster oval to be found in other compositions.

Tabletop
Paragone, Hardstone, Alabaster. Early XVII century
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop
Paragone, Hardstone, Alabaster. Early XVII century
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop has a geometrical decoration with a large central oval framed by two volutes. The border combines ovals and diamonds with floral motifs. A similar type of decoration is to be found on the walls of a number of seventeeth-century Roman chapels.

Table top with alabaster oval
Marble, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Early Finales del siglo XVI - XVII century
Roman Sculptor
Table top with alabaster oval
Marble, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Early Finales del siglo XVI - XVII century
Roman Sculptor

This table top, which was in the Alcázar of Madrid by 1636, is a typical product of Roman hardstone workshops, which reused marble and alabaster from classical ruins. The top has a large central oval and an outer border of geometrical motifs with white outlines. The inner black background with scroll work and flowers suggests the influence of the Florentine Opificio delle Pietre Dure.

Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop belonged to Rodrigo Calderon, secretary to Philip III, who seems to have acquired it by somewhat unethical means. Its decoration of military motifs suggests that it is related to the victory at Lepanto. After Calderon´s death in 1621 it was acquired by Philip IV at the posthumous sale of his possessions. The table is supported by four bronze lions, three of them commissioned by Velaz

Tabletop
Marble, Hardstone, Alabaster, Coral. Ca. 1570
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop
Marble, Hardstone, Alabaster, Coral. Ca. 1570
Roman Sculptor

This is considered to be the earliest tabletop of this kind in Spain to judge from the materials used and the similarity of the decoration to other such tabletops in Florence (Museo degli Argenti). The geometrical decoration recalls Roman work of this period, although the relationship with drawings by the Florentine architect G.A. Dosio and others by Niccoló Gaddi may also suggest a Florent

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