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The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial
Oil on canvas. 1660 - 1665
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban
The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial
Oil on canvas. 1660 - 1665
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban

In this personification of the Virgin Mary as the Immaculate Conception, the protagonist, although still very youthful, is not as childlike as those of Zurbarán and Velázquez and lacks the descriptive and symbolic elements commonly found in earlier, undoubtedly archaic versions. Allusions to the litanies are omitted and artist reduces the image to the bare essentials: the young and s

Penitent Magdalen
Oil on canvas. 1641
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto
Penitent Magdalen
Oil on canvas. 1641
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto

Traditionally identified as the woman who was a sinner and wept on Christ’s feet and wiped away her tears with her hair (Luke 7:36-50), Mary Magdalene is shown here as the hermit saint she became upon giving up her life of moral decadence, after her encounter with the Savior. She kneels in prayer at the entrance to her cave and raises her eyes to heaven, eyes that are perhaps disproportionately la

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. First half of the XVII century
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. First half of the XVII century
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1665
Antolínez, José
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1665
Antolínez, José

This is one of the most successful of this painter´s many known Immaculate Conceptions, thanks to its serenity and exquisite beauty. His inventive capacity is continually visible in the vast repertoire of variations he brings to his treatment of a single religious subject. The symbols of the Marian litany are always present, but the angels´ heads are never the same, nor do their groups

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1665
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1665
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban

The colours of the Virgin’s tunic and cloak, her loose hair, hands crossed on her breast, her devoted gaze raised to heaven and the presence of the moon are elements of the imagery of the Immaculate Conception. Full-length depictions of this subject always include the moon at the Virgin’s feet.

The Virgin of Louvain
Oil on panel. Ca. 1520
Orley, Bernard Van
The Virgin of Louvain
Oil on panel. Ca. 1520
Orley, Bernard Van

According to the Latin inscription on the back of this panel, which attributes it to Jan Gossaert, it was acquired by the magistrate of Louvain in 1588 from that city’s Augustinian monks. It was intended as a gift of thanks to Philip II for having waived the taxes and tariffs owed by the inhabitants of Louvain for twelve years after that city was decimated by the plague in 1578. Seeking to give th

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1682
Valdés Leal, Juan de
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1682
Valdés Leal, Juan de

The Virgin Mary stands on the Moon, surrounded by clouds in an image that varies from the predominant approach to representations of the Immaculate Conception in Seville. Most such works emphasize dynamism, seeking immediately legible formulas and triumphal contents, but here, Valdés Leal proposes a more meditative approach through a more complex presentation. Mary’s ascent to heaven is not

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1781
Maella, Mariano Salvador
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1781
Maella, Mariano Salvador

This is a preparatory sketch for the painting of the main altarpiece of the Chapel of Saint Anthony at Madrid´s church of San Francisco el Grande. It was part of the decoration of the church promoted by King Carlos III, which was completed in 1781. Seven court painters, all members of the Academy, were commissioned to carry out one of the most important decorative projects of that period, between

The Judgement of a Soul
Oil on canvas. 1663 - 1664
Cerezo, Mateo
The Judgement of a Soul
Oil on canvas. 1663 - 1664
Cerezo, Mateo

The judgement of an individual soul is a subject rooted in popular religious theater. The oldest known depictions date from the 15th century and show an angel and a devil arguing over the possession of the soul in question as Christ and the Virgin look on. Here, however, the painter takes a different approach to what may be a concrete event. Five figures are arranged on two parallel but overlappin

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1712
Palomino y Velasco, Acisclo Antonio
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1712
Palomino y Velasco, Acisclo Antonio

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1665
Antolínez, José
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1665
Antolínez, José

The Virgin wears blue robes and a silver lamé tunic, a crown of stars and a halo with the Holy Ghost above. Around her, ten angels bear attributes such as a palm frond, irises, lilies, roses, an olive branch, a scepter, a mirror and a crown. Two very similar versions, respectively at the Ivison Collection in Jerez de la Frontera and the Museo Lázaro Galdiano, are signed, and the latt

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1683
Arco, Alonso del
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1683
Arco, Alonso del

Drawn from the Apocalypse of Saint john, The Immaculate Conception is a frequent iconic subject in Spanish painting. In Madrid, especially during the second half of the 17th century, it was so frequently depicted that a specific and characteristic approach was developed. Years before he painted the present work, Alonso del Arco made a canvas on the same subject for the Jesuit Church of Alcal&aacut

The Annunciation
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1660
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban
The Annunciation
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1660
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban

A New Testament scene (Luke 1, 26-38) that depicts the Archangel Gabriel´s Annunciation to the Virgin Mary and her acceptance of the fact that she will become the Mother of God through the intercession of the Holy Ghost. The Virgin is accompanied by three of her traditional attributes: a sewing basket and book, which symbolize her hard work and devotion; and a spray of lilies, which symbolize her

Saint in Prayer
Oil on canvas. 1888 - 1889
Sorolla y Bastida, Joaquín
Saint in Prayer
Oil on canvas. 1888 - 1889
Sorolla y Bastida, Joaquín

For Sorolla and his wife, the time spent in Italy formed part of the years at the beginning of their relationship when they confronted their first difficulties together. As late as 1915, nearly thirty years after this trip, Sorolla noted in a letter to his wife that he had ‘ordered a little frame for the Virgin you gave me when I left Spain to study in Rome. I think it looks good on it and will ma

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1647
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1647
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto

La obra se sitúa en la fase final de la actividad del artista, que utiliza el mismo esquema compositivo que otras composiciones anteriores suyas del mismo tema. Se conocen numerosas copias, entre ellas una en el convento de las Carmelitas de Boadilla del Monte (Madrid) y otra (280x180) en la iglesia de San Andrés de Calahorra (La Rioja) (Spinosa, N. Ribera: la obra completa, Fundación Arte Hispáni

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. XVII century
Rizi, Francisco
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. XVII century
Rizi, Francisco

An extremely broad development certainly makes this one of the most ambitious and complex depictions of the Immaculate Conception ever painted in Madrid, as well as one of the finest by this painter. In an iconographic sense, it closely follows the traditional model for this subject, presenting the Virgin as the Woman of the Apocalypse (chap. XII, 1).Upright and walking on the lunar globe, crowned

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1665 - 1675
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1665 - 1675
Murillo, Bartolomé Esteban

The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1628 - 1630
Zurbarán, Francisco de
The Immaculate Conception
Oil on canvas. 1628 - 1630
Zurbarán, Francisco de

The worship of the Immaculate Virgin is one of seventeenth-century Spain´s identity traits, especially following a considerable argument between her defenders and her detractors, which took place in Seville in 1616. From then on, that city became one of the country´s leading Conceptionist centers and its painters dedicated much of their energy to promote that devotion. Zurbarán was one of t

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