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Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor
Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a statue of Athena, created between 450 and 440 B. C. by the Greek sculptor Myron, together with the figure of Marsyas. Installed on the Acropolis of Athens, between the Propyleus and the Parthenon, the original bronze group represented Athena who was angered by the attitude of the Marsyas who was shown in the attitude of picking up the double flute which she had rejected a

Aristogiton
White marble. Late I century
Roman Sculptor
Aristogiton
White marble. Late I century
Roman Sculptor

The first political monument erected by the Athenian democracy was the group of the tyrannicides Harmodius and Aristogiton who, in 514 B. C., killed the tyrant Hipparcus. The two bronze statues by Critius and Nesiotes were set up in 477 B. C. in the Agora of Athens and they show the mortal attack of the aristocrats. The Prado head belongs to a herm which may have decorated the garden of a Roman vi

Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor
Wingless Cupid
Bronze. 25 A.C. - 15
Roman Sculptor

This Augustean-era classicist version of a late Hellenistic Eros (c. 100 B. C.) once carried a metal torch in each hand. It is an example of the so-called “dumb servants”. In this case, the Cupid probably served to illuminate the bedroom of an affluent Roman’s mansion.

Athena Promachos
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor
Athena Promachos
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor

Despite some variations in the tunic sleeves, the subject and position of this Roman copy indicate that it is modeled after the famous Athena Promachos (outfitted for war with a lance and shield), a nine-meter-high bronze sculpture (ca. 450 B.C.) attributed to Phidias that dominated the Acropolis of Athens. Its style marks it as a characteristic work of the period of emperor Hadrian, when differen

Philip II's Tabletop
Africano marble, White marble, Agate, Jasper, Lapis lazuli. Before 1587
Roman Sculptor
Philip II's Tabletop
Africano marble, White marble, Agate, Jasper, Lapis lazuli. Before 1587
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop was sent from Rome by Cardinal Alessandrino, nephew of Pope Pius V, to Philip II of Spain in 1587. Of unusual proportions, it is designed to create the impression that the inlay is made of precious stones. The bronze mounts date from the reign of Isabel II. Like the Table of don Rodrigo Calderon (O00448), this tabletop rests on four of the twelve lions that Velazquez commissioned fro

Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor
Tabletop of don Rodrigo Calderon
Africano marble, White marble, Polychrome marble, Paragone, Lapis lazuli, Alabaster. Ca. 1600
Roman Sculptor

This tabletop belonged to Rodrigo Calderon, secretary to Philip III, who seems to have acquired it by somewhat unethical means. Its decoration of military motifs suggests that it is related to the victory at Lepanto. After Calderon´s death in 1621 it was acquired by Philip IV at the posthumous sale of his possessions. The table is supported by four bronze lions, three of them commissioned by Velaz

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