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Dream of Some Men Who Were Eating Us
Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dream of Some Men Who Were Eating Us
Pencil, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for the etching Capricho 13. They are Hot (G02101). This work is one of twenty-six pen drawings that make up the Dreams series on which the Caprichos were based. Both the preliminary and preparatory drawings differ in some ways from the final print. While the first version of Drawing 63 from the Madrid Album (Jolly Caricature -obverse D04369-) is much harsher in its criticism -

Wild merchants
Pencil, Iron gall ink, Black chalk lines on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Wild merchants
Pencil, Iron gall ink, Black chalk lines on laid paper. 1796 - 1797
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for the etching Capricho 11, Lads Making Ready (G02099 / G00644) is part of The Dreams, a series of twenty-six pen-and-ink drawings that serve as the basis for the Caprichos. Headed by Dream 1. The Author Dreaming, which became number 43 in the definitive and expanded Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period in compositions employed by Enlightenment critics

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Printer’s proof prior to the first edition Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona), before the replacement of the letter “y” with “ll” in “rollona”. Etching and burnished aquatint The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and r

Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 14, What a Sacrifice! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period as dreams were used to represent the world from the perspective of the artist’s imagination without reference to any concrete reality. The print and the preparatory drawing (D04195) are identical except for some background details. We know the subject thanks to handwritten comments by Valent&iacu

All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 19. The satirical tone that Goya employs in the Caprichos in which he criticises prostitution is applied to both the girls and their clients, the latter depicted as plucked chickens. The artist’s comment on this drawing refers to the young men and women’s inevitable end: “And to think those about to fall won’t take warning from those already fallen. But there is no remedy: all will fall.”

They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como “moza de silla”, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como “sentar la cabeza”, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer una escena paródica del madrileño Paseo o Saló

Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 68, Pretty teacher!

Bad Night
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bad Night
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 36, Bad Night is part of The Caprichos.The sense of social criticism can be grasped in Valentín Carderera’s manuscripts at the Museo del Prado, the Biblioteca Nacional and the 1791 and 1803 editions of the Dictionary of the Real Academia Española. The Prado’s manuscript reads: This kind of work is done by the sluttish women who do not want to stay home (women of the street w

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona). The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and refers to a foolish, spoilt individual who behaves like a baby.

Lads Making Ready
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Lads Making Ready
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on paper. 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 11, Lads Making Ready (G02099 / G00644) is part of the Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period in compositions employed by Enlightenment critics. The print and drawing have different but similar compositional schemes. As usual, Goya reduced the number of characters from five to three, simplifying the composition in a way that resembles his tapestry cartoon from 1870, The T

Of what illness will he die?
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Of what illness will he die?
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 40, Of what illness will he die? In the Caprichos, Goya assimilated different satirical traditions, some of which were learned and others popular, ranging from the literature of the Spanish Golden Age and moralising texts from the Enlightenment to contemporary material in proverbs, parodies, popular sayings, folklore and theatrical representations, and including also what he could encount

Tantalo
Indian ink, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Tantalo
Indian ink, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Prueba de estado de la estampa G02097 (1a edición). Aguada de tinta china y trazos a pluma en el cabello de la mujer y pechos. Mayor nitidez e intensidad tanto en los trazos de aguafuerte como en las superficies de aguatinta respecto a la primera edición. Para poder apreciar en todo su valor una obra de arte es necesario conocer su proceso creativo, el modo en que fue concebida en sus aspectos for

Those specks of dusts
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Those specks of dusts
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya ha reproducido en esta estampa un Autillo o penitencia pública, y el sentido de su título, indica claramente que ha querido satirizar las actividades de la Inquisición y las costumbres que ésta engendra en el pueblo. En la escena se representa a una mujer sentada en una grada o banquillo encima de un tablado con sambenito y coroza, la cabeza caída sobre el pecho en ademán de avergonzado, y al

Poor little things!
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Poor little things!
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Estrecha relación entre el dibujo preparatorio a sanguina (D04211) y la estampa, tanto en lo formal como en la leyenda. La inscripción del dibujo explica el significado de la composición: las prostitutas detenidas son enviadas al hospicio de San Fernando. La escena muestra una de las muchas redadas efectuadas por las autoridades, con objeto de controlar la prostitución callejera. Sin embargo, Goya

Here comes the bogey-man.
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Here comes the bogey-man.
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Los Caprichos is the most widely disseminated of Goya´s series of prints and consists of 80 plates. They were published in 1799, following a creative process that began in 1794 with two sets of drawings, collected in the Madrid Album and the Sanlúcar Album. These drawings provided the genesis for several images in the series. During these four years, Goya sketched the Sueños (Dreams)

Blow
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Blow
Drypoint, Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The etching Blow is Capricho number 69. The initial idea for Capricho 69, Blow, already appears in drawing 57 of Album B, and its descriptive title, Aunt Oilstains lights the Hearth, Witches to Gather Up, conferred a greasy echo to the name of the head witch who uses a child as the bellows for fanning the fire in their den. A second pen-and-ink drawing (D04192), which Goya titled Dream of Consumma

Lads Making Ready
Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Lads Making Ready
Japanese chisel, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 11, Lads Making Ready (G02099 / G00644) is part of Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period in compositions employed by Enlightenment critics. The print and drawing have different but similar compositional schemes. As usual, Goya reduced the number of characters from five to three, simplifying the composition in a way that resembles his tapestry cartoon from 1870, The Tobac

Tantalo
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Tantalo
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

En la estampa se representa un hombre desesperado que clama al cielo, mientras sostiene en sus rodillas una mujer, al parecer muerta. Goya aborda el amor y muerte, asuntos que captaron la atención del movimiento romántico. Según Lafuente Ferrari (1977: 50), la pirámide es el símbolo de la muerte, y como tal es la representación simbólica de los fenecidos amores de Goya con la duquesa de Alba y la

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