The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

RDF
Refine results
56 results
Exhortation
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Exhortation
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 16, Exhortation. The print varies from this preparatory drawing in certain aspects of its composition. It increases the number of figures, which makes it more confusing, and adds a dramatic tone to the woman’s facial expression. The series of figures aligned to form a chain alludes to the difficulty of choosing between virtue and chastity, on one hand; and lechery and vice, on the othe

Folly of fear
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Folly of fear
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 2, Folly of fear, belongs to a series that Goya began in 1815 as a faithful reflection of his historical and personal context when, in the aftermath of the Peninsular War, he witnessed the collapse of part of the progressive world with which he somehow felt personally identified. He probably worked on this series until 1819, when political changes associated with the triumph of General

What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 59, What is the use of a cup?. Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya a

Approaching the bull with lances, scimitars, banderillas and other weapons
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on white laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Approaching the bull with lances, scimitars, banderillas and other weapons
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on white laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

La estampa, Tauromaquia, 12, Desjarrete de la canalla con lanzas, medias-lunas, banderillas y otras armas, pertenece a la serie grabada por Goya, dominada siempre por el patetismo trágico, entre la primavera de 1814 y el otoño de 1816, siendo telón de fondo el final de la Guerra de la Independencia y la restauración en el trono de Fernando VII en 1814. El tema de los toros, por su aparente inmedia

Strange Devotion!
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Strange Devotion!
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In his novel, Rinconete and Cortadillo (1613), Miguel de Cervantes has his character, Monipodio, say the following about two old men in his band of criminals, who, despite being thieves, “were man of considerable truth and very honorable, with good lives and reputations. God-fearing and conscientious, they attended mass every day with strange devotion.” The adjective that qualifies their devotion

There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Rather than simply reflecting concrete events, Goya sought to capture their essence. He therefore placed himself alongside the action, taking part in a way that no previous artist ever had. This explains the proximity of the figures presented in each of the Disasters, which are monumental and very close to the viewer, barely leaving room for anecdotal details in the background. It is possible to i

Hapless Mother!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hapless Mother!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

When Goya penciled his tiles on the complete set of prints that he gave to his friend, Ceán Bermúdez, each word was rigorously adapted to the composition and to the critical intentions with which it had been conceived. Such is also the case with this preparatory drawing, in which the woman’s condition as a mother is emphasized by the presence of her young daughter, while the adjectiv

The carnivorous vulture
Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The carnivorous vulture
Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 76, The carnivorous vulture.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevitably

Cruel Folly
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Cruel Folly
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 6, Cruel Folly. The title of the plate comes from an artist’s proof now at the Museo Lázaro Galdeano in Madrid. Before this state proof with the handwritten title, Cruel Folly came to light, Beruete and Camón Aznar called the plate Foolish Fury because of its protagonist’s appearance. They described him as a furious man with bulging eyes and hair standing on end who has k

The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 10, The Kidnapping Horse, closely resembles Folly of Fear (D04274) in its technique, with light reddish washes to define the wooded background and more intense washes for the figures. Its notable similarity to the corresponding engraving (G02178) reveals that Goya conceived this drawing with considerable compositional clarity, unlike others in the series. However, he made significant c

He defends himself well
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
He defends himself well
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 78, He defends himself well. In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevitably

Against the Common Weal
Etching, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Against the Common Weal
Etching, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The interpretation of the Emphatic Caprices focuses on different aspects of the repression and the return to absolutism that followed King Ferdinand VII’s return to Spain. These are clearly set out in his Royal Decree of May 4, 1814: “In accordance with the decided and widespread demonstrations of my peoples’ will, inasmuch as they are just and well founded, We declare [...] that constitution and

They do not know the way
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They do not know the way
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 70, They do not know the way.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevitably

This too
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
This too
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 43, This too.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevitably resulted in suf

The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 10, The Kidnapping Horse, closely resembles Folly of Fear (D04274) in its technique, with light reddish washes to define the wooded background and more intense washes for the figures. Its notable similarity to the corresponding engraving (G02178) reveals that Goya conceived this drawing with considerable compositional clarity, unlike others in the series. However, he made significant c

Nothing. The Event will tell
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Nothing. The Event will tell
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

More has been written about Nothing. The Event will tell (number 69 of the Disasters of War), than about any other preparatory drawing for the Disasters. Its cryptic character has sparked a variety of iconographic readings, and even more interpretations that seek to divine Goya’s inner thoughts at a time that was unquestionably adverse for him in the personal sense. Its obscure meaning may well be

Loyalty
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Loyalty
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 17, Loyalty.

People in Sacks
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
People in Sacks
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 8, People in Sacks

Up