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Portrait of a Gentleman
Oil on panel. 1550 - 1555
Volterra, Daniele Ricciarelli Da
Portrait of a Gentleman
Oil on panel. 1550 - 1555
Volterra, Daniele Ricciarelli Da

Michel Hochmann identified the painting in the Capodimonte as the ‘Quadretto corniciato di pero tinto con un ritratto di un giovane, in pietra di Genova, di mano del medesimo [Daniele]’ refered to in the 1600 inventory of the possessions of the antiquarian Fulvio Orsini (1529–1600). The artist referred to is Daniele Ricciarelli, known as Daniele da Volterra, and the attribution of the work seems s

Sappho
Marble. S XVI - XVII century
Anonymous
Sappho
Marble. S XVI - XVII century
Anonymous

Cabeza femenina con el pelo sujeto por una cinta y cubierto por un pañuelo. Por delante de las orejas caen dos pares de rizos sobre las mejillas. Este prototipo creado en Grecia fue tradicionalmente identificado como Safo, aunque también como ninfa o musa.Cacciotti (1994) opina que la cabeza del Museo del Prado pudo pertenecer a la colección Giustiniani, basándose en la identificación de un grabad

José de Madrazo
Marble. XIX century
Ponzano Gascón, Ponciano
José de Madrazo
Marble. XIX century
Ponzano Gascón, Ponciano

Retrato del pintor y director del Museo del Prado José de Madrazo. La obra de Ponciano Ponzano estuvo marcada por los ideales clásicos de su amplia formación tanto en la academia zaragozana, en la Academia de San Fernando como, sobre todo, en Roma a donde marchó como pensionado en 1832, donde permaneció hasta 1841.La escultura procede del Museo de Arte Moderno, donde ya figuraba catalogado en 1899

Juan de Villanueva
Marble. 1878
Gragera y Herboso, José
Juan de Villanueva
Marble. 1878
Gragera y Herboso, José

Juan de Villanueva (1739-1811) is represented somewhat larger than life-size, dressed in late eighteenth-century style and covered with a cape. This enlightened architect designed the Prado Museum building, which was originally intended to be a Museum and Cabinet of Natural Sciences. The artist follows the same characteristics found in some of his other commemorative sculptures, such as those of t

The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor
The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor

This is the last portrait of Vibia Sabina (83-136 A. D.), wife of the emperor Hadrian. It does not represent her at her real age (some 48 years), but is a highly idealised and rejuvenated image. Her hairstyle is not a traditional roman one but is inspired by the imagery of the goddess of Diana. The portrait reflects the intention of making her appear ageless.

The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor
The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor

The image of Publius Aelius Hadrian (76-138 A. D.) did not change much during his rule (117-138 A. D.). This effigy shows him in his maturity, and can thus be dated between 130 and 138 A.D. Despite a degree of realism in his features, the emperor´s interest in idealization is visible here in the curly hair and short beard, which allude to his philosophical bent and his passion for Classical Greece

The Emperor Nero
Marble. Ca. 1565
Bonanome, Giovanni Battista; Bonanome, Nicola
The Emperor Nero
Marble. Ca. 1565
Bonanome, Giovanni Battista; Bonanome, Nicola

In 1562 and 1565 Philip II commissioned the Bonanome brothers to execute two series of busts of the “Twelve Emperors” of whom Suetonius wrote biographies. The monarch was not satisfied with the busts and had them sent to the gardens of the Casa de Campo in Madrid in 1571. This monumental head of Nero reproduces with slight variations the last portrait of the notorious emperor (54-68 AD).

Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor

The sitter is depicted with a dense head of curly hair, a carefully trimmed beard, thin moustache, and a goatee beard between his mouth and chin. The young man’s elegant hairstyle imitates portraits of the Emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus of 161 A. D. The military cloak indicates that the sitter had recently embarked on a military career.

Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor
Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor

The refined features of this distinguished young man recall those of the Emperor Nerva (96-98 AD) and his hairstyle reflects that of the previous Emperor, Domitian (81-96 AD). But this head also has some individualised features. One of a series of the Twelve Emperors given by Pius V to Philip II in 1568, it is likely that at that time this portrait was considered to depict Domitian.

Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor

This is a modern copy of a Roman portrait of a young man from the period of the Emperor Commodus (180-192 AD). While the beard recalls portraits of Hadrian (such as E-176 in the Prado) and others from the Antonine period (E-113), the hairstyle suggests images of Alexander the Great. The subject may have been an officer in the Roman army.

Greek Youth
White marble. 200 - 217
Roman Sculptor
Greek Youth
White marble. 200 - 217
Roman Sculptor

The Greek word “neoni” inscribed on this portrait means “young”, but it could also be the name of this unknown sitter, Neon. With regard to his appearance, the hairstyle recalls that of Alexander the Great and the features those of Antinous. This head can be approximately dated to the period of the Emperor Caracalla, a great admirer of Alexander.

The Emperor Constantine the Great
White carrara marble. 312 - 325
Anonymous
The Emperor Constantine the Great
White carrara marble. 312 - 325
Anonymous

Numerous portraits of Constantine of this type were produced to mark his victory over Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 A. D. Coins of the period depict him as invictus (unconquerable) with a nimbus in the manner of the Sun, considered at that time to be the centre of the universe, like the Emperor.

The Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Marble. Ca. 170
Anonymous
The Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Marble. Ca. 170
Anonymous

Esta cabeza, que a primera vista no parece antigua sino barroca, es el retrato de Marco Aurelio (121-180 d.C) en la última fase de su vida. Característicos del cuarto tipo de retrato de los rizos peinados radialmente desde la frente y las sienes; el Emperador aparece de esta forma en tres monumentales relieves de Estado, los que quizá procedan de un arco de triunfo que le fue dedicado en 176 d.C,

The Emperor Hadrian
Marble. 1600 - 1650
Anonymous
The Emperor Hadrian
Marble. 1600 - 1650
Anonymous

This portrait of Hadrian (117-138 AD) does not follow a specific classical model, freely interpreting elements such as the curls of his hair and his expression. It may have belonged to Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689). It is technically comparable to the bust of Caligula (E00375).

Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor

Realism in the depiction of physical features is one of the characteristics of Roman portraiture. The hairstyle became a further identifying element, indicating the importance given to personal adornment and changes in fashion. Here the subject wears a false, curly hairpiece, a common practice among noblewomen of the period in emulation of the Emperor Titus’s daughter Julia Flavia (AD 64-91).

Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor
Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor

Este retrato de una romana entrada en años y con una mirada que delata seguridad de sí misma impresiona aún hoy por su realismo bien dosificado. En tanto los rasgos faciales autenticos de la retratada, dan la impresión de haber sido reproducidos sin mayores modificaciones, las zonas de piel desnuda, en cambio, aparecen alisadas debido al pulimento de la superficie del marmol, de modo que la repres

Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor
Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor

The portrait is of a mature, high-class lady with a serene and somewhat tired expression. Like many portraits of its era, it imitates the hairstyles adopted in the imperial household, in this case of Faustina the Elder (105-141 B. C.), wife of the emperor Antoninus Pius.

Dionysus
White marble. 75 - 100
Roman Sculptor
Dionysus
White marble. 75 - 100
Roman Sculptor

This Roman herm, which was probably made to decorate a theatre, uses an image of Dionysus in the form of a mask, created between 425 and 400 B. C. in Athens. At that time, it was usual to hang these masks, which only reproduce the god’s head, in the sanctuaries of Dionysus for his worship. The archaic hairstyle is also repeated in masks of the Classical period.

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