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The Marchioness of Santa Cruz
Oil on unlined canvas. 1805
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Marchioness of Santa Cruz
Oil on unlined canvas. 1805
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Joaquina Téllez-Girón y Pimentel (1784-1851) was the daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Osuna and Marchioness of Santa Cruz by her marriage to José Gabriel de Silva y Walstein in 1801. A friend of poets and literati, she was one of the most admired women of her time. Goya presents her wearing white crêpe and reposing on a canapé upholstered in red velvet. She is

The Sculptor Pietro Tenerani
Pencil on dark yellow paper. 1842
Madrazo y Kuntz, Federico de
The Sculptor Pietro Tenerani
Pencil on dark yellow paper. 1842
Madrazo y Kuntz, Federico de

Retrato de Pietro Tenerani, escultor que comenzó su formación en la Academia de Bellas Artes de Turín hasta que consiguió marchar a Roma en 1813. Se convirtió en la mano derecha del escultor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844) y vivió de primera mano la enconada rivalidad entre su maestro y Antonio Canova (1757-1822). La carrera del turinés fue afianzándose gracias a sus creaciones y a su labor como pr

Youth with Swan
Carrara marble. 1808
Álvarez Cubero, José
Youth with Swan
Carrara marble. 1808
Álvarez Cubero, José

A handsome youth feeds a swan that he his holding by its neck. Intended as an ornamental piece, Álvarez combines his taste for the dynamic forms of Greek sculpture with the polished, matt finish of the Praxitelean school; these tastes were shared by his master Antonio Canova, whose influence is evident.

María Isabel de Braganza, Queen of Spain
Carrara marble. 1826 - 1827
Álvarez Cubero, José
María Isabel de Braganza, Queen of Spain
Carrara marble. 1826 - 1827
Álvarez Cubero, José

Posthumous life-size statue of Queen Isabel de Braganza (1797-1818), the second wife of Fernando VII (1784-1833). The queen appears sitting on a chair adorned with figures of castles, lions and lilies, wearing a belted tunic, with robes and a studded diadem. This clothing was very much in style at that time. Its composition recalls the Agripina in the Capitolino Museum of Rome. This neoclassical w

Venus and Mars
Marble. 1820 - 1830
Canova, Antonio (Circle Of)
Venus and Mars
Marble. 1820 - 1830
Canova, Antonio (Circle Of)

The Marquess of Salamanca sold Venus and Mars by Antonio Canova (1757-1822) to the Museo del Prado in 1881. At the time of acquisition, its attribution had been maintained for decades, but when Pavanello was cataloguing all of Canova’s work in 1976, he considered it a copy. While focusing on Canova’s workshop, Reyero (1996) thought the piece could have been made in the 1820s by someone in Canova’s

Hebe
Marble, Metal. 1825
Tadolini, Adamo
Hebe
Marble, Metal. 1825
Tadolini, Adamo

This portrayal of Hebe, the personification of Youth, was traditionally attributed to Antonio Canova; now, however, it is thought to be wholly the work of Tadolini, Canova’s most gifted student. It was commissioned by the Duchess of Osuna.

Apolo inspirado por la música
Carrara marble. 1814 - 1819
Álvarez Cubero, José
Apolo inspirado por la música
Carrara marble. 1814 - 1819
Álvarez Cubero, José

Apollo holds a lyre and in keeping with Praxitelean ideals adopts an elegant contraposto pose. The original version was commissioned by Antonio Canova to decorate the Real Casa del Labrador at Aranjuez, but during the Pensinsula War Álvarez Cubero was forced to sell it in order to survive. He later made this second version, which he never completed.

The Defence of Zaragoza
Carrara marble. 1818 - 1825
Álvarez Cubero, José
The Defence of Zaragoza
Carrara marble. 1818 - 1825
Álvarez Cubero, José

This is the most important work by the artist known as the “Spanish Canova”, in reference to the great master of Neo-classical sculpture, Antonio Canova, who was Álvarez Cubero’s master. The group was designed in the Castel Sant’Angelo in Rome where the sculptor was imprisoned in 1808 for refusing to accept Napoleon’s brother Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain. The sculpture represents the s

Venus and Cupid
Carrara marble. 1807
Ginés, José
Venus and Cupid
Carrara marble. 1807
Ginés, José

The goddess Venus rises from a shell, while Cupid plays with a piece of drapery. Although Ginés did not study outside Spain, he absorbed the Neoclassical style from other contemporary sculptures and by studying the casts at the Academia de San Fernando. This work, commissioned by Charles IV for the Real Casa del Labrador in Aranjuez, was Ginés’s first sculpture in marble.

Mercury
Marble, Bronze. 1806
Barba, Ramón
Mercury
Marble, Bronze. 1806
Barba, Ramón

Like Cubero’s Apollino (E00805), this sculpture of the young Mercury bearing his caduceus, inspired by the Doryphoros of Polykleitos, was intended for the statue gallery at the Real Casa del Labrador at Aranjuez, and was commissioned by the great Neoclassical sculptor Canova. Other Spanish sculptors working in Rome -Álvarez Cubero, Solá and Campeny- were also involved in the project,

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