The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

Refine results
4 results
Dante in Thought
Plaster. 1864
Suñol y Pujol, Jerónimo
Dante in Thought
Plaster. 1864
Suñol y Pujol, Jerónimo

Los escultores españoles, en su gran mayoría, buscaron fuentes de inspiración en Italia, durante sus estancias en este país, en muchos casos pensionados por diferentes corporaciones. Suñol bebió de las fuentes clásicas y renacentistas y culminó su producción realista con una excepcional interpretación de la figura de Dante (1265-1321). Esta obra, un claro ejemplo de las influencias recibidas duran

To the Ideal
Plaster. 1896
Blay y Fábrega, Miguel
To the Ideal
Plaster. 1896
Blay y Fábrega, Miguel

Blay made this extremely delicate and highly idealized sculptural group to show that he was capable of creating works outside of the strictures of realism. As he put it: “I plan to call it White Souls, two predestined souls that reach their goal, moving forward resolutely, overcoming setbacks and wanting neither to feel the thorns on which they walk nor to pay heed to the stumbling blocks they enc

Nero and Seneca
Plaster. 1904
Barrón González, Eduardo
Nero and Seneca
Plaster. 1904
Barrón González, Eduardo

Nero and Seneca was awarded a first-prize medal at the National Fine Arts exhibition in Madrid in 1904. Barrón never produced a final version of it, in bronze or marble, making this preparatory plaster of unusual size particularly important. It reveals the exquisite handling, technical skills and mastery of the classical idiom that characterise his style. On loan for many years to Cordoba T

The Annunciation
Plaster. 1901
Coullaut Valera, Lorenzo
The Annunciation
Plaster. 1901
Coullaut Valera, Lorenzo

The ideal of the Virgin Mary as a feminine archetype of perfection persisted throughout the nineteenth century. An exemplary mother and wife, her resignation to her fate was interpreted as the principal model of moral behaviour for women. Coullaut transferred these ideas to the naturalist figure of a submissive woman who accepts the mission she has been charged with. This notion of selflessness is

Up