The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

Refine results
38 results
Crouching Aphrodite
White marble. Mid-IIcentury
Roman Sculptor
Crouching Aphrodite
White marble. Mid-IIcentury
Roman Sculptor

Roman copy of a crouching Aphrodite who originally had both arms raised to shake her long hair with her hands. The copy is based on a late Hellenistic original created circa 100 B. C. in Rhodes which, in turn, combines the figure of the famous Crouching Aphrodite by the sculptor Doidalsas of Bithynia (c. 250 B. C.) with a standing Aphrodite Anadyomene (rising from the waters) from the same period.

Ariadne sleeping
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor
Ariadne sleeping
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor

En la pintura de Velázquez que representa una vista del jardín de la Villa Medici en Roma (P1211) se identifica en una logia la estatua de una figura yacente apenas esbozada por el artista. De la figura recostada, que en 1787 pasó a Florencia, al Palazzo Pitti, y posteriormente al Museo Arqueológico de aquella ciudad, ya entonces se conocían otras dos réplicas de tamaño mayor que el natural, en Ro

Deified Emperor
Marble. Ca. 50
Roman Sculptor
Deified Emperor
Marble. Ca. 50
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture consists of a seventeenth-century head of Augustus and a torso of Augustus or Tiberius dating from the beginning of the first century A.D. This type of iconography, with a body based on the art of Polycletus (fifth century B.C.) and clothed in the traditional Roman toga, was used to represent emperors deified after death. These statues were made for the temples of imperial worship.

Hercules
White marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor
Hercules
White marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor

This Roman statue reproduces with some changes the Lansdowne Hercules (Malibu, Getty Museum) by a pupil of Polyclitus made about 350 B. C. In addition to inverting the two sides of the model, this work changes the facial expression which stands out on account of its emotiveness. The hero is shown in a victorious pose holding a club (currently restored) and the pelt of the lion of Nemea. The death

Venus of Madrid
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Venus of Madrid
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture is a Roman copy of a Hellenistic original dating from the second-first century B.C. Stripped of the baroque additions that distorted it, it is part of a large cycle of Venuses linked by similar postures. The beginning of this type of sculpture would seem to lie in a work by Lysipus or his school known through a Roman copy: the Venus of Capua. In it, the goddess, with a nude torso, l

Aegis-Bearing Jupiter
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Aegis-Bearing Jupiter
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

The Roman image of Jupiter, inspired by a statue of Zeus from the fifth century B. C., shows the god wearing the aegis (protective cloak) which, according to Homer, was used by Zeus as a weapon to create clouds and thunderstorms. Zeus later gave it to Athena as a magic shield. The sculpture was restored to include a lightning bolt in the right hand.

Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor
Athena
White marble. Early I century
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a statue of Athena, created between 450 and 440 B. C. by the Greek sculptor Myron, together with the figure of Marsyas. Installed on the Acropolis of Athens, between the Propyleus and the Parthenon, the original bronze group represented Athena who was angered by the attitude of the Marsyas who was shown in the attitude of picking up the double flute which she had rejected a

Leda
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor
Leda
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of a famous work by Timotheus (c. 370 B. C.). This Greek sculptor, known for his activity in Epidaurus and in the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, shows Leda partly naked as a result of a sudden movement which opens her dress. This new feature was surpassed twenty years later by Praxiteles with the creation of the totally naked Aphrodite of Cnidus. The viewer has to imagine the abs

Pensive Muse
White marble, Travertine. 69 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Pensive Muse
White marble, Travertine. 69 - 90
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

In classical Antiquity the subjects of sculptures were identified by their attributes or gestures. In this case the figure’s pensive pose suggests that of one of the Muses, Polyhymnia or Clío, depicted in sarcophagus scenes as listening attentively to the god Apollo’s music. Based on late Hellenistic models, this figure was made in the Flavian period, possibly to decorate a library.

Fortuna-Tyche
Marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor
Fortuna-Tyche
Marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor

During the reign of Christina of Sweden (1626-1689), who owned this work, this sculpture was completed with a new head and roses and turned into a Flora. In fact it originally depicted Fortuna, goddess of fate, who holds a cornucopia as a sign of abundance and leans on a small figure of Tyche, another Greek representation of the same divinity. The stiff execution of the present version makes its H

Fortuna
White carrara marble. 150 - 200
Roman Sculptor
Fortuna
White carrara marble. 150 - 200
Roman Sculptor

The goddess Fortuna holds a cornucopia and a rudder resting on a globe. The statue is based on a Greek original, an Artemis by the School of Polyclitus (4th century BC), as may be seen from the similarity in the band across her bust. The head and left hand are later additions. Christianity did little to undermine faith in Fortuna, who was extremely popular in Rome.

Apollo with Zither
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor
Apollo with Zither
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor

This statue is a Roman copy of a late Hellenistic statue (c. 100 B. C.) which, in turn, was inspired by the main statue of the temple of Apollo Sosianus in Rome, made by the Athenian sculptor Timarchides (c. 150 B. C.). The god is represented as the guide of the muses and the source of divine inspiration, playing his favourite instrument with his (now lost) right hand.

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor
The Dance of the Maenads
White marble. 120 - 140
Roman Sculptor

The four reliefs of Bacchantes (E00042, E00043, E00045 y E00046) are Roman copies of Greek originals made in Athens in the late fifth-century B.C. to adorn a monument to Dionysius, or related with theatrical activity under his patronage. The reliefs show Dionysus’s followers who, on account of their unrestrained dance, were called Maenads. Wearing almost transparent dresses and their jewels, they

Athena Parthenos
Marble. 130 - 150
Roman Sculptor
Athena Parthenos
Marble. 130 - 150
Roman Sculptor

A miniature Roman reproduction of the famous statue that Phidias made for the Parthenon in Athens between 447 and 438 B.C. The original was about eleven meters in height and was of gold and ivory. The finest copies, of which the present is an outstanding example, are small works with certain differences in proportion and details. Here, the cleanness and depth of the vertical folds are notable and

Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor
Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor

Two ancient fragments with a different origin were skilfully joined in the seventeenth century to create the statue. Augustus, clad in the toga of a Roman citizen, offers a sacrifice with his head covered, thereby demonstrating veneration of the gods. The portrait, less common than the other type in the Prado (E00119), offers a more realistic representation and a more natural hairstyle. Both portr

The Muse Polyhymnia
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor
The Muse Polyhymnia
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor

The upper part is a Roman copy of a late Hellenistic original (100-50 B. C.). It shows Polyhymnia, the muse of sacred poetry and dance, placing her cloak over her left shoulder. Another copy in the Vatican shows her wearing a crown of large flowers as her only attribute. The lower part (E00218) is an addition from the seventeenth century, perhaps made in Bernini’s workshop.

Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Queen Christina of Sweden’s famous puteal is not a parapet (puteal in Latin), but an altar from the garden of a Roman villa (the top is currently missing). The different scenes of the relief show several moments of a Dionysiac party in a sacred enclosure with its commemorative columns, altars, a Priapus herm and a sacred tree with a grapevine. The dance, music and drunkenness scenes interchange wi

Up