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These, too
Red chalk on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
These, too
Red chalk on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In this drawing and the They can still serve (D04244), Goya presents one of his harshest criticisms. At first glance, both seem to depict village people picking up the war wounded and carrying them to the hospital to be cured—an unquestionably charitable and patriotic gesture. And that could well be the subject of these works were it not for their titles. With what Lafuente Ferrari (1952, pp. 61 a

They play another with the cape in an enclosure
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They play another with the cape in an enclosure
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Here in his distinctive visual history of bullfighting, Goya shows an enclosure closed with a barrier, and three Arabs inside, one of them kneeling in a similar posture to that of prayer in a mosque. They represent both, the residents of Al Andalus and the Manluk soldiers who fought for Napoleon in the Peninsular War. Their figures are drawn with precision compared to those of the spectators, who

I saw it
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
I saw it
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The value of Goya’s war images is largely determined by their plausibility. This makes them visual referents for what happens in war. Neither their status as narrative nor the esteem in which they are currently held depend on whether or not they reflect lived experience, but at that time it must have imbued them with added value. Obviously, Goya could not have seen many of these events with his ow

Charity
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Charity
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 27, Charity. Once more, Goya eliminates any reference that could specifically identify the event being depicted in order to create an emotionally gripping scene whose main idea is once again the lack of respect for a human body. The nature of this subject may be what led Goya to intentionally present it in a way that keeps viewers from clearly identifyin

It’s no use crying out
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It’s no use crying out
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 58, It’s no use crying out.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both s

Nothing. The Event will tell
Touches of white chalk, Grey-brown wash, Gouache / tempera on blue laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Nothing. The Event will tell
Touches of white chalk, Grey-brown wash, Gouache / tempera on blue laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for number 69 of the Disasters of War, Nothing. The Event will tell, very freely presents the original idea, and does not belong to the group of red-chalk drawings for that final work, which it only distantly resembles. More has been written about Nothing. The Event will tell, than about any other preparatory drawing for the Disasters. Its cryptic character has sparked a v

He deserved it
Red chalk on laid paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
He deserved it
Red chalk on laid paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 29, He Deserved it. There have been efforts to identify the concrete events depicted in this print, but as Lafuente Ferrari pointed out, there were so many that it may be easier to believe that Goya chose a more abstract presentation to represent events so frequent that they constituted one of the fatal consequences of the war. This desire for abstractio

Unhappy mother!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Unhappy mother!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

When Goya penciled his tiles on the complete set of prints that he gave to his friend, Ceán Bermúdez, each word was rigorously adapted to the composition and to the critical intentions with which it had been conceived. Such is also the case with this preparatory drawing, in which the woman’s condition as a mother is emphasized by the presence of her young daughter, while the adjectiv

The beds of death
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The beds of death
Red chalk on laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

If death has been explicit and omnipresent over the course of the numerous Hunger prints, its name has not appeared in their titles until now. This work may be one of the most expressive of all, as well as one of the most meditative. Goya’s ideas for this composition were clear from the beginning, and the scant differences between the preparatory drawing and the final print are due almost exclusiv

You don’t know what a burden you are carrying
Brush, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Black chalk lines, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
You don’t know what a burden you are carrying
Brush, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Black chalk lines, Wash on laid paper. 1814 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The last part of Album C -drawings 119 through 131- consists of a group of images that present clergy of both sexes with a degree of irony emphasized by the titles that Goya wrote on each page. Criticism of certain aspects of the clergy’s behavior is a constant in his work, and it can be followed from the time of the Caprichos. In this album it becomes especially relevant, as the secularized clerg

Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 80, Will She Live Again? This drawing presents the outcome of the previous one (D03983). The volume of prints that the artist gave to Ceán with the title Fatal Consequences of Spain’s Bloody War with Bonaparte. And other Emphatic Caprices began with the premonitory image of a dejected man, defenseless before the terrible circumstances brought on b

Approaching the bull with lances, scimitars, banderillas and other weapons
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Approaching the bull with lances, scimitars, banderillas and other weapons
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

El dibujo preparatorio para Tauromaquia, 12, Desjarrete de la canalla con lanzas, media-lunas, banderillas y otras armas pertenece a una serie, dominada siempre por el patetismo trágico, que Goya grabó entre la primavera de 1814 y el otoño de 1816,, siendo telón de fondo el final de la Guerra de la Independencia y la restauración en el trono de Fernando VII en 1814. El tema de los toros, por su ap

This is not less
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
This is not less
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The title indicates the continuity between this composition and he preceding one of the series, Strange Devotion, where a group of people are shown venerating a sacred mummy being carried by a donkey. Here, several old men dressed in an outmoded fashion, carry an icon of Our Lady of Solicitude on their backs. The ridiculousness of both scenes makes clear Goya´s critical and sarcastic attitudes tow

Folly of fear
Red chalk, Wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Folly of fear
Red chalk, Wash on laid paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This preparatory drawing for Disparates, 2, Folly of fear, belongs to a series that Goya began in 1815 as a faithful reflection of his historical and personal context when, in the aftermath of the Peninsular War, he witnessed the collapse of part of the progressive world with which he somehow felt personally identified. He probably worked on this series until 1819, when political changes associate

The same elsewhere
Red chalk on laid paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The same elsewhere
Red chalk on laid paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 23, The same elsewhere. A comparison of this print with the preparatory drawing reflects an interesting manner of conceiving the definitive image. In the drawing’s battle scene, one of the combatants is still standing after being shot, but in the engraving, they all lie on the ground alongside their weapons. The extreme precision employed by Goya in this

They can still serve
Red chalk on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They can still serve
Red chalk on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In this drawing and the following one (D04245), Goya presents one of his harshest criticisms. At first glance, both seem to depict village people picking up the war wounded and carrying them to the hospital to be cured—an unquestionably charitable and patriotic gesture. And that could well be the subject of these works were it not for their titles. With what Lafuente Ferrari (1952, pp. 61 y 152) c

Strange Devotion!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Strange Devotion!
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 66, Strange Devotion! In his novel, Rinconete and Cortadillo (1613), Miguel de Cervantes has his character, Monipodio, say the following about two old men in his band of criminals, who, despite being thieves, “were man of considerable truth and very honorable, with good lives and reputations. God-fearing and conscientious, they attended mass every day wi

Truth has died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Truth has died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disaster 79, Truth has died. This scene, along with Disaster 80, Will she live again?, marks the end of the series of engravings that constitute the first edition of the Disasters of War (1863). Despite the apparent disorder visible in this series, it has an inner logic that presents the subjects more or less in groups, using titles to link the images and creating sequenc

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