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The Countess of Chinchón
Oil on unlined canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Countess of Chinchón
Oil on unlined canvas. 1800
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

María Teresa de Bourbon y Vallabriga, Marchioness of Boadilla del Monte and Countess of Chichón, was the daughter of infante Luis Antonio de Bourbon by María Teresa Vallabriga y Rozas. She was born inn the family palace of Velada (Toledo) on 26 November 1780, during the distancing from the court to which she was subject, along with her mother and brothers. On the death of Luis

Folly of fear
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Folly of fear
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 2, Folly of fear, belongs to a series that Goya began in 1815 as a faithful reflection of his historical and personal context when, in the aftermath of the Peninsular War, he witnessed the collapse of part of the progressive world with which he somehow felt personally identified. He probably worked on this series until 1819, when political changes associated with the triumph of General

Strange Devotion!
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Strange Devotion!
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on wove paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In his novel, Rinconete and Cortadillo (1613), Miguel de Cervantes has his character, Monipodio, say the following about two old men in his band of criminals, who, despite being thieves, “were man of considerable truth and very honorable, with good lives and reputations. God-fearing and conscientious, they attended mass every day with strange devotion.” The adjective that qualifies their devotion

The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 10, The Kidnapping Horse, closely resembles Folly of Fear (D04274) in its technique, with light reddish washes to define the wooded background and more intense washes for the figures. Its notable similarity to the corresponding engraving (G02178) reveals that Goya conceived this drawing with considerable compositional clarity, unlike others in the series. However, he made significant c

Cruel Folly
Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Cruel Folly
Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 6, Cruel Folly. The title of the plate comes from an artist’s proof now at the Museo Lázaro Galdeano in Madrid. Before this state proof with the handwritten title, Cruel Folly came to light, Beruete and Camón Aznar called the plate Foolish Fury because of its protagonist’s appearance. They described him as a furious man with bulging eyes and hair standing on end who has k

Big Booby
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Big Booby
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 4, Big Booby. The big booby was an intellectually challenged giant who danced licentiously to the sound of the castanets at carnivals. In this drawing, he frightens a clergyman who hides behind a manikin or devotional image. In the print (G02172), however, Goya has set the scene at night, discarding the frightened figure’s religious clothing, softening the giant’s face and providing hi

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