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The Extraction of the Stone of Madness
Oil on oak panel. 1501 - 1505
Bosch, Hieronymus
The Extraction of the Stone of Madness
Oil on oak panel. 1501 - 1505
Bosch, Hieronymus

In the centre of a rectangular surface Bosch incised a circle in which he depicted this scene of Extracting the stone of madness. The resulting image is a mirror that offers a reflection of folly and human madness, located in a rural world remote from that of the nobility and urban life, hence the setting in the countryside in an open landscape. As found in miniature painting of the time, the arti

Isabel de Valois holding a Portrait of Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1561 - 1565
Anguissola, Sofonisba
Isabel de Valois holding a Portrait of Philip II
Oil on canvas. 1561 - 1565
Anguissola, Sofonisba

This portrait is a full-length likeness of Philip II’s third wife, Queen Isabel de Valois. She wears a black gown with pointed sleeves and a long train that is curled around her body and billows at the back. Poking out from beneath her hanging sleeves, held in place with ruby and diamond buttons and lined in white fabric, are silver and gold undersleeves. The one-piece gown is decorated with appli

Judith at the Banquet of Holofernes
Oil on canvas. 1634
Rembrandt (Rembrandt Harmensz. Van Rijn)
Judith at the Banquet of Holofernes
Oil on canvas. 1634
Rembrandt (Rembrandt Harmensz. Van Rijn)

In the past various authors have expressed their scepticism about the attribution of the painting to Rembrandt. However, the Rembrandt Research Project includes it in the Corpus of 1986 as an original work, and this is supported by the technical study conducted at the Museo del Prado that year. As for the signature, the unsteadiness of the stroke and, above all, the yellow colour make it dubious.

Queen Elisabeth of Valois, third wife of Philip II
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1605
Pantoja de la Cruz, Juan
Queen Elisabeth of Valois, third wife of Philip II
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1605
Pantoja de la Cruz, Juan

As he was often required to do, Pantoja de la Cruz here copied an original by Sofonisba Anguissola (c. 1535-1625) of Cremona; it was her first portrait of the young queen. It is an attractive adaptation to Spanish conventions, but using warmer, lighter colours; a marmot-fur stole has also been added to the queen’s costume.In this three-quarter portrait Queen Isabel de Valois (1546-1568) wears a bl

Portrait of Queen María Luisa as Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)
Portrait of Queen María Luisa as Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)

Mengs had a profound influence on the younger generation of Spanish painters, notably on the Bayeus, Maella, Inza, Goya and Vicente López Portaña. His Neoclassical style was diametrically opposed to Tiepolo´s, whose style and paintings were falling out of fashion. The Spanish Collections hold many of his portraits. He was a refined and skyfull court painter with exquisite technique,

Portrait of King Charles IV as Prince of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)
Portrait of King Charles IV as Prince of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)

Mengs had a profound influence on the younger generation of Spanish painters, notably on the Bayeus, Maella, Inza, Goya and Vicente López Portaña. His Neoclassical style was diametrically opposed to Tiepolo´s, whose style and paintings were falling out of fashion. The Spanish Collections hold many of his portraits. He was a refined and skyfull court painter with exquisite technique,

Wall Clock
Alabaster, Metal, Mother-of-pearl, Glass, Wood. XIX century
Anonymous
Wall Clock
Alabaster, Metal, Mother-of-pearl, Glass, Wood. XIX century
Anonymous

Wall clock of the type called "bull´s eye". It has an alabaster dial with white enamel cartridges and blue Roman numerals, and perforated metal hands. It is decorated with mother-of-pearl inlays, sandblasting and painted decoration. Folding lid with upper front opening by means of a hinge and socket closure. French model, of Elizabethan tradition, was a very widespread typology throughout Eu

Circular Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Circular Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Circular Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Circular Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Oval platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Oval platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Pocket tool case
Copper alloy. Third quarter of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Pocket tool case
Copper alloy. Third quarter of the XVIII century
Anonymous

This sort of English painted enamel object was first made around 1725, but little is known of the early production, in part because this was a very modest craft. It reached its zenith between 1753 and 1756, when such pieces were manufactured by a London firm in Battersea that even employed decorative artists from the nearby Chelsea porcelain factory. This firm declared bankruptcy in 1756 and its m

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous
Octagonal Chinese porcelain platter. Dutch East India Company
Hard-paste porcelain. First half of the XVIII century
Anonymous

Chinese products, especially silks and porcelains, had long been known in the West. The earliest imported porcelains were mostly blue-and-white pieces from the period of Emperor Ming, Wan Li. Chinese makers soon grasped that Europeans knew little of porcelain and began producing export products that were accepted as authentic artworks in the West, despite their vulgar appearance and even their imp

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