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A Larder
Oil on canvas. Before 1636
Snyders, Frans
A Larder
Oil on canvas. Before 1636
Snyders, Frans

Snyders invented a type of scene of domestic interiors in which animals are the principal protagonists. Here a dog which has entered a larder and taken a large piece of meat is looking defiantly at another one chewing a string of sausages. The overturned basket of fruit and the broken china indicate the damage caused by their violence.

The Bivouac
Oil on panel. 1640 - 1650
Teniers The Younger, David
The Bivouac
Oil on panel. 1640 - 1650
Teniers The Younger, David

Of the artists who painted war scenes in the 17th century, none was as interested as David Teniers II in capturing images from behind the lines. With his customary tactile rigor, he depicts a plethora of military objects lying in the foreground with no apparent order and a handful of figures hanging cuirasses or helping their colleagues to remove their footgear. At the same time, he draws on one o

Tereus' Banquet
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Rubens, Peter Paul (And Workshop)
Tereus' Banquet
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Rubens, Peter Paul (And Workshop)

Tereus, King of Thrace and wife of Procne, raped his sister-in-law, Philomela, cutting out her tongue in order to avoid being denounced. But when Philomela weaves a tapestry, her sister Procne discovers the atrocious event. In vengeance, she kills Tereus´ son, serving it to him in a macabre banquet. The story is based on Ovid´s Metamorphoses (Book VI). Rubens chose to depict the exact moment when,

The Taking of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Taking of Christ
Oil on canvas. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a representation of the taking of Christ by Roman soldiers, a scene from the New Testament that marks the beginning of his Passion (Matthew 26, 45-46; Mark 14, 41-52; Luke 22, 45-54; John 18, 1-9). This is a preparatory sketch for the painting that adorns one of the altars at the Sacristy of Toledo Cathedral. Here, Goya´s manner of working is visible: rapid and energetic brushstrokes creat

The Martyrdom of Four Monks at the Roermond Charterhouse
Oil on canvas. 1632
Carducho, Vicente
The Martyrdom of Four Monks at the Roermond Charterhouse
Oil on canvas. 1632
Carducho, Vicente

On August 29, 1626, King Philip IV’s painter, Vicente Carducho (ca. 1576-1638), signed a contract for the creation of a cycle of paintings to celebrate the founding of the Carthusian Order by Saint Bruno and its leading members. This colossal undertaking sought to visually narrate numerous episodes from the Carthusians’ history and tradition. It was the most complete commission ever dedicated to t

Surprise Attack on a Convoy
Oil on panel. 1620 - 1625
Brueghel The Younger, Jan; Vrancx, Sebastian
Surprise Attack on a Convoy
Oil on panel. 1620 - 1625
Brueghel The Younger, Jan; Vrancx, Sebastian

In addition to major battles and lengthy sieges, seventeenth-century warfare also involved small skirmishes which affected the civil population. Sebastian Vrancx, whose initials appear on the rump of the dapple-grey horse in the foreground, painted the figures in this scene and Jan Brueghel the Younger the landscape.

Royal Couples
Oil on canvas. 1770
Paret y Alcázar, Luis
Royal Couples
Oil on canvas. 1770
Paret y Alcázar, Luis

This canvas depicts an equestrian event that took place at the Palace of Aranjuez in 1770. It was attended by Charles III and Princess María Luisa, his daughter-in-law, who are to be seen in the second box adjoining the palace façade, and by a crowd of subtly individualised figures. On horseback at the forefront of the pairs of riders are Prince Carlos and the Infantes Gabriel and Lu

Samson and the Philistines
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1625
Procaccini, Giulio Cesare
Samson and the Philistines
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1625
Procaccini, Giulio Cesare

Samson freed himself from his chains and killed a thousand Philistines, enemies of the Israelites, using only the jawbone of an ass (Judges 15:15). Giulio Cesare was the son of the painter Ercole Procaccini and was first trained as a sculptor in Milan. This painting dates from his last period. The frame, which is modern, reproduces a Lombard seventeenth-century model.

Duel with Cudgels, or Fight to the Death with Clubs
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Duel with Cudgels, or Fight to the Death with Clubs
Mixed method on mural transferred to canvas. 1820 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The mural paintings that decorated the house known as “la Quinta del Sordo,” where Goya lived have come to be known as the Black Paintings, because he used so many dark pigments and blacks in them, and also because of their somber subject matter. The private and intimate character of that house allowed the artist to express himself with great liberty. He painted directly on the walls in what must

Throat-cutting
Oil on tin plate. Ca. 1808
Anonymous
Throat-cutting
Oil on tin plate. Ca. 1808
Anonymous

Companion of the work The Bonfire (P07111). Scenes of this type are commonly found in nineteenth-century paintings inspired by Goya. The artist’s followers looked to his most cruel, violent compositions such as Cannibals (Besançon, Musée des Beaux-Arts) or the scenes of attacks by bandits (Marqués de la Romana collection). The rendition of the anatomies, their particular expre

The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Fight at the Cock Inn (Brawl at the Mesón del Gallo Inn)
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is the preparatory sketch for the cartoon of The Fight at the New Inn (P-770). It differs from the final composition in some respects, most importantly the name of the inn, which is “The Cock Inn” in this case. A fight has broken out over a card game, with a variety of people of different origins and social classes taking part. Adquirido en

Attack on a Jewish Quarter
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1865
Lameyer y Berenguer, Francisco
Attack on a Jewish Quarter
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1865
Lameyer y Berenguer, Francisco

This picture clearly displays the influence of Goya as well as the artist’s familiarity with the French Romantic painters, particularly Delacroix. Lameyer was among the first Spanish artists to explore Oriental themes, then fashionable in Europe. Paintings in this genre often depicted North Africa - which Lameyer had visited in 1862 - as a setting for violent action.

A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a quarrel among men in front of a tavern which Goya calls the New Tavern. The area near Madrid now called “Ventas,” and tknown as “Ventas del Espíritu Santo” in Goya´s time, was frequented by muleteers, caleche drivers, troublemakers and gamblers, as Goya illustrates here. The cards thrown on the table seem to be the origin of the dispute. The subject recall

Capture of a Stronghold
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1697
Giordano, Luca
Capture of a Stronghold
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1697
Giordano, Luca

Luca Giordano decorated three spaces in the Casón, an outbuilding of the Buen Retiro Palace, Madrid. The first was the central hall, which still exists, where he painted the fresco Apotheosis of the Spanish Monarchy, as well as sixteen scenes of the Labours of Hercules, now sadly lost.Two galleries that flanked this hall were destroyed in the late nineteenth century. The eastern one led to

I saw it
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
I saw it
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. 1810 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The value of Goya’s war images is largely determined by their plausibility. This makes them visual referents for what happens in war. Neither their status as narrative nor the esteem in which they are currently held depend on whether or not they reflect lived experience, but at that time it must have imbued them with added value. Obviously, Goya could not have seen many of these events with his ow

Wounded being evacuated from the battlefield
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. Ca. 1811
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Wounded being evacuated from the battlefield
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. Ca. 1811
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This drawing related to one of the Disasters of War was neither engraved nor published.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the b

Severity is not always good
Indian ink, Wash on dark yellow laid paper. 1816 - 1820
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Severity is not always good
Indian ink, Wash on dark yellow laid paper. 1816 - 1820
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A boy trying to do his homework buries his face in his hands to protect himself from the threat of an old woman´s whip. The brutality of the punishment is decisively underlined by the authoritative presence of the old woman, with her legs and hands open, her dominant figure contras with the smallness of the child. The almost animal characters of the woman´s face correspond to the irrationality of

Women Surprised by Soldiers
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. Ca. 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Women Surprised by Soldiers
Red chalk, Conté crayon on laid paper. Ca. 1812
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Though related to Goya’s Disasters of War, this drawing was neither engraved nor published. Its composition is framed in red chalk and the corners are emphasized with touches of the same material. The composition of drawing D03989 is similar to that of D03988. The central group and the soldier in the opening on the right coincide in both images, which differ only in the figures in the middle groun

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