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Lower Part of God the Father, Hermitage of Vera Cruz, Maderuelo (Segovia)
Fresco painting on mural transferred to canvas. XII century
Anonymous
Lower Part of God the Father, Hermitage of Vera Cruz, Maderuelo (Segovia)
Fresco painting on mural transferred to canvas. XII century
Anonymous

The mural paintings from the Hermitage of the Vera Cruz de Maderuelo were transferred to canvas in 1947 and reconstructed at the Prado Museum in a layout as faithful to the original as possible. The walls of the chapel are decorated with figures of angels, Apostles and evangelical scenes, and the front bears two biblical themes. Dome, center: God the Father held by four angels (P07269, P07270). Le

Marianne of Austria, Queen of Spain
Oil on canvas. Second half of the XVII century
Anonymous
Marianne of Austria, Queen of Spain
Oil on canvas. Second half of the XVII century
Anonymous

Marianne of Austria (1634–1696) was the daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand III of Austria and his wife Maria. In 1649, at 15 years old, she was betrothed to her uncle Philip IV, the Great, who was 44 years old at the time. She had five children with him: Princess Margaret Theresa (1651–1673), later Empress of Germany; another girl who died a few days after her birth; Prince Philip Prospe

The Prodigal Son receiving his Inheritance
Oil on canvas. XVII century
Anonymous
The Prodigal Son receiving his Inheritance
Oil on canvas. XVII century
Anonymous

Semiprecious-stone box
Hardstone, Ebony wood. 1650 - 1700
Anonymous
Semiprecious-stone box
Hardstone, Ebony wood. 1650 - 1700
Anonymous

Florentine Mosaic is a technique in which semiprecious stones are cut and assembled so that their different colors and grains form a pictorial composition. This term reflects the fact that the technique emerged in 16th-century Florence with a degree of perfection that has since been equaled, but never surpassed. Its origins undoubtedly lie in classic mosaic—Roman opus sectile—as the technique is e

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