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Apparition of the Miraculous Cross to an Army
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1657 - 1661
Cano, Alonso (Circle Of)
Apparition of the Miraculous Cross to an Army
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1657 - 1661
Cano, Alonso (Circle Of)

A research study published by Javier González Santos has revealed that the 19th-century inventories of the Museo del Prado accurately cited the subject of this drawing as alluding to the Holy Cross and the cave of Covadonga. In fact, this painting depicts the Apparition of the Victory Cross to the foot soldier Pelagius of Asturias in the Battle of Covadonga and is directly related to the en

The Virgin Appears to Saint Felix of Cantalice
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1653 - 1657
Cano, Alonso
The Virgin Appears to Saint Felix of Cantalice
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1653 - 1657
Cano, Alonso

In the upper right register, the Virgin is seated on clouds and the Christ Child moves away from his mother towards Saint Felix, whose open arms await the little one entrusted to his care. In the lower left register, Saint Felix and another Capuchin monk kneel on the steps of a stone platform in a monastic cell. Through the open balcony, the foliage outside can be perceived. The very well develope

Miracle at the Tomb of Saint Peter Martyr
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso
Miracle at the Tomb of Saint Peter Martyr
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso

This drawing depicts the miraculous power of Saint Peter Martyr, the first Dominican martyr whose tomb in Milan became an important pilgrimage site. The Golden Legend documents at least one example of a demon-possessed woman who was cured before the venerable remains of the saint (alluded to in the drawing by the woman on the left, from whose mouth the demon escapes). Purely physical maladies were

The Virgin with the Christ Child
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. XVII century
Cano, Alonso
The Virgin with the Christ Child
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. XVII century
Cano, Alonso

The Virgin is depicted in three-quarter length, slightly turned towards the left and holding the Christ Child. A veil covers part of her head, and voluminous folds of this same garment surround her waist and hips. The background is plain. The Christ Child is turned towards the face of his mother, whose large, dark eyes look beyond the viewer with a distant and serious expression. This drawing is n

Standing Angel
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1630
Cano, Alonso
Standing Angel
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1630
Cano, Alonso

Sánchez Cantón thought the inscription on the banner was by the artist himself and added that this may have been the design for an ex-libris or a frontispiece. The Museo del Prado’s 1857 and 1879 inventories refer to it as “A Cupid.” Wethey dates it from around 1635-1638, during the artist’s period in Seville, and does not believe the inscriptions are by the artist.Veliz dates it in

The Virgin standing, looking up to the right
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso
The Virgin standing, looking up to the right
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso

This drawing, probably a fragment of a finished composition for a Calvary, depicts the Virgin in a pronounced contrapposto position, looking to her right and slightly upwards, where she once saw her Son on the cross. The technique of this drawing is quintessentially the style of Cano: a slight preparatory sketch, followed by distinct contours and a wide range of lights and shadows magnificently re

The Virgin interceding for Humanity
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso
The Virgin interceding for Humanity
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso

Among the works in Antonio Palomino’s collection were a series of small composition drawings by Alonso Cano. These fall within an important decorative programme for the convent of Santa Cruz la Real de Granada and narrate the life of Saint Dominic. A text by Palomino constitutes the first reference to Cano’s drawings: ‘And at that time, he produced all the drawings for the paintings in the cloiste

Angels with Flaming Swords pursuing Heretics
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso
Angels with Flaming Swords pursuing Heretics
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso

The foreground and the right-hand side of the drawing are occupied by two angels wielding flaming swords to chase away three figures who have fallen to the ground while fleeing. In the background, two angels lead a Dominican monk towards an arched doorway adorned with a cross and a tiled roof. It has not been easy to link this iconography with the Dominican legend. The figures in the foreground ar

Saint Dominic blessing a Pilgrim
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on paper attached to canvas, yellow laid paper. XVII century
Cano, Alonso
Saint Dominic blessing a Pilgrim
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on paper attached to canvas, yellow laid paper. XVII century
Cano, Alonso

The drawing corresponds to the painter’s mature period when he had already gained all his extensive experience and knowledge as a draughtsman. This is perceptible from the intelligent use of ink wash; that is to say, the application of the different layers of ink with the brush for shading and to create volume. This is achieved by pen strokes that recreate the folds of the fabric. It was initially

Christ tied to the Column
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1642 - 1644
Cano, Alonso
Christ tied to the Column
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1642 - 1644
Cano, Alonso

Three-quarters of Christ’s figure is depicted. He appears with his hands tied to the column and his torso bent forward from the waist as if the position of his hands had forced him to bend. The figure is isolated against a plain background with only the objects necessary for this iconography; the column and the rope binding the hands. Christ’s head is slightly raised, and he looks at the viewer fr

Saint Joseph and the Christ Child
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso
Saint Joseph and the Christ Child
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso

This beautifully finished drawing depicts Saint Joseph and the Christ Child walking through a landscape. A tree situated to the right appears just behind Saint Joseph. The Christ Child carries a large basket and Saint Joseph, a rod. He holds the child by the wrist, a detail specifically found in various versions of this theme produced by Cantarini, Elsheimer and Sánchez Cotán. It is

The Sacrifice of Abraham
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown ink, Wash on yellow laid paper. 1650 - 1652
Cano, Alonso
The Sacrifice of Abraham
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown ink, Wash on yellow laid paper. 1650 - 1652
Cano, Alonso

Several pieces of paper have been glued to the original support by the artist in order to correct the original lines of certain parts of the composition (the angel’s shoulder and Abraham’s head). Isaac appears at the right, lying seminude and blindfolded on the pyre of trunks. Abraham brandishes a knife in his right hand, holding his son’s head with the left and turning to look at the young angel

Young Saint John and the Christ Child
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1666 - 1667
Cano, Alonso
Young Saint John and the Christ Child
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1666 - 1667
Cano, Alonso

Kneeling at the left, with his left arm around the lamb, young Saint John raises his eyes to the nude Christ Child standing at his side. The scene is presented in a heart-shaped cartouche. This is a preparatory drawing for the painting at the Hermitage, which Wethey considers a late work, painted in Granada around 1660-1667. Evidently, it is based on Reni’s Bolognese prints of drawings by Carracci

The Virgin presenting the Rosary to Saint Dominic
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso
The Virgin presenting the Rosary to Saint Dominic
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1665
Cano, Alonso

In the upper right register, the Virgin is kneeling on a cloud and holding the Christ Child. From her hand hangs a rosary that Saint Dominic (standing to the left) and the Pope (kneeling at the centre in front of a kneeling king) both grasp. In the upper left register, a small angel bathed in shadows swings three rosaries. During the 15th century, Saint Dominic was erroneously credited with the in

Female Nude
Pencil, Grey-brown ink, Wash on laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso
Female Nude
Pencil, Grey-brown ink, Wash on laid paper. 1645 - 1650
Cano, Alonso

In this superb drawing acquired in 1997, two different and independent motives are overlapped. The main one is a nude woman on a bed, but arches and architectural elements have been drawn over it. The woman is not lying down, as is customary in this type of image. Instead, she is reclining, and that generates a very special tension between her expression of receptive abandon and a position that su

Design for an altarpiece dedicated to Saint Andrew, from Madrid / Heads
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1643
Cano, Alonso
Design for an altarpiece dedicated to Saint Andrew, from Madrid / Heads
Pencil, Pencil ground, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. Ca. 1643
Cano, Alonso

Un retablo imponente, de elegantes proporciones, no incluye demasiados componentes pictóricos o escultóricos, confiriendo así mayor importancia a la arquitectura y su ornamentación. En el registro inferior no hay elementos figurativos de pintura ni escultura, solo los compartimentos que flanquean el tabernáculo coronado por la urna que guardan los restos de San Isidro, venerados en aquel momento e

Jesus conversing with Saint John the Evangelist
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1660 - 1665
Cano, Alonso
Jesus conversing with Saint John the Evangelist
Pencil, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1660 - 1665
Cano, Alonso

The drawing depicts two standing figures conversing: to the left, Saint John, beardless, holding a chalice in his right hand and turning his head towards the figure on the right, who is probably Jesus. The relatively young, bearded figure does not display any other attributes. However, he also extends his hand, in this case the right, over the chalice. The joining of the hands around the chalice s

Saint John the Evangelist in Patmos
Pencil, Pencil ground, Ink, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1635 - 1645
Cano, Alonso
Saint John the Evangelist in Patmos
Pencil, Pencil ground, Ink, Grey-brown wash on yellow laid paper. 1635 - 1645
Cano, Alonso

This drawing depicts a mature Saint John (he may be depicted in youth or old age). He appears seated to the left, possibly on the roots of a tree, and holds a writing tablet. Nevertheless, he is not looking at the tablet, but instead he fixes his gaze towards the eagle that is his emblem. The intense abstraction of his face possibly denotes his visionary state. The elements of Saint John’s vision

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